From the Attic: Bonn- the Birthplace of the German Constitution 1949

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BONN- On this day 70 years ago, the German Constitution was ratified, thus ushering in the Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland). It was the first democratic government since the Weimar Republic, which was created in 1919 but lasted only 14 years. It also brought in its first chancellor Konrad Adenauer, who until 1998, became the longest tenured chancellor in modern German history, having served from 1949 until his resignation in 1963. Bonn was its capital until 1994, when it was moved to Berlin, five years after East and West Germany reunited. Since 1999, all federal Offices and the German parliament are conducted in Berlin.

While Germany has some Milestones to celebrate, it is interesting to see how the West German government ratified the Constitution, which still remains in use and is discussed to this day (See the previous article on it here.). Two “Exemplars” on its ratification can be found in this article below; the first produced by the British channel Pathé, the other in German by Zeitzeuge Portal, which includes interviews with historians and political scientists in German. In either case, they are both interesting to see the reaction to the creation of West Germany from local and outsider perspectives.

Enjoy! 🙂

Pathé (UK):

 

Zeitzeuge Portal:

 

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Germany at 70: The Constitution

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May 23rd, 2019. On this day 70 years ago, the West German government, together with the western allies of the US, France and Great Britain ratified the German Consititution, a set of basic laws that are binding and foster equality, freedom of speech and Democracy. The basic laws were the basis for establishing a democratic state, the first since the Weimar Republic of 1919. And unlike the Republic, which was dissolved with the rise of Adolf Hitler, who ushered in the era of Naziism 14 years later, the German Constitution has become the solid rock, one of the examples of how Democracy works even to this day, despite going through the hardships in the sense of politics, society and the economy.  This was even adapted by the former East German government in 1990 as part of the plan to reunify the country.

While there are booklets in many languages that have the Basic Law of Germany, there are some questions that are still open as to how it works in comparison to those in other countries, the US included. This documentary, produced by a bunch of American scholars, gives you an in-depth coverage and discussion to the laws that exist. Albeit Long, one can skip to some of the laws discussed or just simply play it in ist entirety. For those wishing to live in Germany in the future, even temporary, this is rather useful.

Enjoy the documentary! 🙂

 

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About nine out of ten respondents believe that the German constitution has proven itself. Citizens are less satisfied with democracy. Article 3 of the Basic Law on equality before the law. © Jens Kalaene / dpa Just before the 70th birthday of Constitution According to a poll, the vast majority of people in Germany are […]

via Germans are satisfied with the Basic Law | TIME ONLINE — Archy Worldys

Sparnberg Bridge: Swinging Between Border and Crossing?

The Bridgehunter's Chronicles

60543169_2487496021269356_7034162429386817536_o Sparnberg Bridge and Mill. Photos taken in May 2019

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SPARNBERG (THURINGIA); GERMANY- Approximately 1-2 kilometers west of the Rudolphstein Viaduct and the Motorway 9 between Berlin and Munich is a small village that has slowly but surely become the forgotten or even lost one. Sparnberg is located on the River Saale. Founded in 1202, the village used to have a population of over 400 inhabitants at the end of World War II. Today it has only 160. The town today is characterized by its small church and market square, a dam and mill that was created in 1999, a park that is just off the Saale Bike Trail and other hiking trails that careen the steep woody hills, and the key crossing between Thuringia and Bavaria- the Sparnberg Bridge.

60831355_2487501947935430_5515844232725659648_o The bridge and a piece of the wall that once stood- now a memorial

To understand the…

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Photo Flick Nr. 15/ Mystery Place

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During a recent hike along the Thuringian/Bavarian border, I happened to find this interesting place: a picnic area on the Thuringian side with a gorgeous view of Bavaria and the River Saale. Little did I realize that there had been four rusty steel fence posts- I-beam style- that was found at every single corner of the picnic area; behind the bench and the table.

I bet the Soviet troops had just as much fun with the picturesque view before 1989.

What was here before this picnic area was established?  Tell us about it. This was found between the Rudolphstein Viaduct (an article can be found here) and the village of Sparnberg, located 1 km west of the bridge and 3 km west of Hirschberg.

 

 

Task: Make a story about this scene.  🙂

 

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It was a change for the better: the Federal Republic has become more liberal, fairer and more democratic. It is now to defend. May 8, 1945, the speaker said, “was as gray and desolate as so many before or even after him.” There are, in fact, people who spoke of the day of liberation: “We […]

via 70th anniversary of the Basic Law: Bastion of Freedom – Politics — Archy news nety

Germany is celebrating three important events this year: The 100th anniversary of the Weimar Constitution, 70th anniversary of its Basic Law and 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. To commemorate these occasions, the Center for Constitutional Studies and Democratic Development (CCSDD) in Bologna and The SAIS Observer are partnering for a series […]

via The Past Shapes the Future: The German Constitution at 70 — The SAIS Observer