Genre of the Week: Mr. Peabody’s Apples, by Madonna

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This book is the first in a long series dealing with the Power of the Apple and how it plays a role in uniting a community and offering love, openness and ideas for a better world. A overture on the series you can find by clicking here

The first aspect of the apple we have looks at the truth. Lately, we’ve been confronted with several new terminologies that circumvent the real definition of the word we’ve chosen to neglect in favor of looking at news according to one person. No matter if it is fake news, alternative facts or the like, lies are lies, and rumors are just as big of a lie as the lie itself. And as one can read in this literary piece, written by a rockstar but inspired by the teachings of the Kabbalah and a founder of a rare religion, Baal Shem Tov, the power of a lie can be as damaging to a relationship as the power of the truth, which reveals pure facts and creates (or even mends) relationships.

The story takes place in a fictitious town called Happyville, and it deals with three key characters in the story: Mr. Peabody, Billy and Tommy. Every Saturday, the town would have a baseball game, where Mr. Peabody was the coach of the Happyville Baseball team, a profession which he holds just as dearly as that of a history teacher in elementary school, his other (but primary) job. One of the players, Billy, would help Peabody with the clean-up after the baseball game, and is considered one of the coach’s favorites because of his support for the team and his moral values.

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However, the character of Mr. Peabody is put to the test, when another student, Tommy, watches him take an apple from Mr. Funkadeli’s Produce Shop after the game, on his way home. Curious, Tommy decides to take his skateboard home but not before explaining Mr. Peabody’s actions to his friends. They observe this again the next Saturday after the baseball team played another game- and lost again, like in the first one. Thanks to the rumors that started spreading like wildfire, the whole town knew about it and the following Saturday after that……

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There was no baseball game, and the town was silent with only a handful of people on the streets- most of them staring at Mr. Peabody with mistrust. Arriving at the field that day, he saw Billy, who explained to him that many people thought he was a thief for stealing an apple.

Mr. Peabody’s response: Yes he takes an apple without paying, but because he pays for it when he grabs his shipment of milk from the store before the game, but picks up the apple after the game. Even the produce-seller confirmed his advanced payment for the apple. 🙂

Tommy received word from Billy about this and went over to Mr. Peabody to apologize for the rumors and asked what can be done to make up for it. Apology accepted but in return, Mr. Peabody asks Tommy to bring a feather pillow to the baseball field an hour later. As windy as it is, he is to do the most unthinkable with the pillow……

And this is where we stop here.

 

You can take a guess at what Tommy does with the pillow at the baseball field, but the action is something that shows us a valuable lesson: Sometimes even a simple way of making up for the tiniest mistake is impossible to do.

Sometimes facing up to the crime and taking the punishment for it is the best way to teach a person a lesson. If you lie in court, you face prison time for perjury and obstructing justice. If you lie to your partner, you face the biggest possibility of a break-up. If you lie to your parents or elders, you lose priviledges or even get spanked. And if you are the leader of a country, even alternative facts can lead you to lose the respect and support of your people, no matter how many wars you lead your country into. In either case, Mr. Peabody’s Apple shows the readers that even a single apple represents the truth involving the character and those around him.

As Madonna wrote, Tommy represented the truth from his point of view and his rumors are along the same lines as the alternative facts presented by President Trump and his White House staff, which the majority of Americans and the rest of the world have long since figured out. His friends making rumors represent the followers of Trump who either have embraced his policies or even accepted him as President without a fight. Harsh and hurtful as it is, I cannot say anything else more but the truth there. Billy represents the person who seeks the truth for himself and accepts the situation as it is, while looking for action that is appropriate. In this case, he understands Mr. Peabody’s logic and does nothing except tell Tommy about it, which led to the pillow episode. Had Mr. Peabody actually stolen the apple, his reactions would have ranged from asking “Why?” to not forgiving him for it. Who knows?

And the person with the apple, Mr. Peabody, he represents the main person in the story who takes action and is ready to explain why. He symbolizes the truth which is an open book, and if opened and read properly, people would understand why. One could implement Mr. Peabody’s actions to the actions taking place right now, whether it is refugees coming to Europe and North America for a better life because of their home regions being torn up by war and no solution to even rebuilding, or even thel logic of trying to nationalize a country to protect the workers from globalization, the phenomenon which is dominating the landscape and bringing countries together to fight problems that are destroying our world, including poverty, scarce resources and most importantly, the environment.

Mr. Peabody’s Apple represents the truth which we seek when we want to understand the actions of others and the lies (be it pure, rumors or even alternative facts) that we try to wrap around, yet it is as sinful as eating the “Apple of Wisdom” prescribed by the Serpeant, which led to Adam and Eve being expelled, according to the Book of Genesis. If we see something that we may see wrong from our end, instead of spreading rumors and lying about it, we should confront the matter and find out why. After all, as I’ve written an earlier piece about confronting the truth, we do have the ideas and tools to make things better for us. We just need to use it properly so that we don’t offend others who might turn around and take action against us in return.

This is where I’m reminded by a quote I posted recently on my old facebook page, which I’m currently dividing up between Trump fans and anti-Trump fans (will have to explain this in a later post):

Never judge others by their behavior before judging your own first. It’s very likely that your actions can influence their opinions about you.

Like in the story, when judging others by their actions, it leaves an impression on them and helps them judge you by your own behavior. If you choose to be ignorant, you can expect the most rotten apple (or one that is tainted with harmful chemicals). If you choose to be open and find out the truth, you can have the best harvest of apples you can imagine. And perhaps one courtesy of Mr. Peabody if you find out more behind his actions and story. 😉

 

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Author’s Anti-alternative fact:  The same rockstar, pop singer and actress, who wrote Material Girl, Crazy for You, Vogue, Take a Bow, Jump and This Used to be My Playground also wrote over two dozen books, mostly during the first decade of the third millenium, including the English Roses collection, Yakov and the Seven Thieves, and The Girlie Show. Mr. Peabody’s Apples, released in 2003, was the second of five children’s books and dozens of short stories and has even made it to Schloastic Magazine in the USA. This includes lesson plans for elementary school.  Madonna splits her time between London and New York and continues to sing and act to this day. You can find more about her via website.

 

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Mystery Places: The Waldenburg-Remse Canal and Bridges

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This mystery article takes us back to western Saxony and a village northeast of Glauchau called Waldenburg. With a population of close to 5,000 inhabitants, the town is located on the western bank of the Zwickauer Mulde, has a beautiful castle and historic city center, as well as an international European School. A link to the city’s homepage will show you what the town looks like and some of the things you can do there.

Aside from a 1940s style bridge that is the primary crossing in Waldenburg, the mystery lies behind a canal located between Waldenburg and a neighboring village Remse. There, two bridges- an arch bridge and a steel pony through girder bridge span this canal, which appears to be at least 60 years old, if not, older. The canal was built along the right-hand side of the Mulde, and it is unknown what its use was. One can make one of two conclusions:

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  1. The canal was built as a diversion canal, similar to the one built in Glauchau that encircled the western part of the city to alleviate the flooding. There, Heinrich Carl Hedrich had already established himself as the inventor of the city drainage system and may have been involved in the designing and construction of the Flutgraben. He had been the city engineer prior to the flooding of 1858 which caused considerable damage to Glauchau and all places to the northeast, including Waldenburg. It is possible that the canal at Waldenburg dates back to the timespan between 1860 and 1900, the time when Glauchau’s diversion canal was being built. As low as the two crossings were, it would be the most logical conclusion as it passage underneath was (and is still is) next to impossible. Yet having a concrete tiling at the bottom of the canal, plus the proximity of the canal to Waldenburg and the palace could lead to conclusion number…..

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  1. The canal provided passage for boats between Remse and Waldenburg. The Mulde is notorious for being shallow but also very muddy, thus making transportation almost impossible. Even water was transported over the river via pipes, thanks to the Röhrensteg in Zwickau, located south of Glauchau and Waldenburg. Therefore diversion canals were the easiest way to go for transporting boats between Glauchau and Waldenburg, having been built in places where the river made boat passage impossible. If this theory is true, then the bridges that exist today were built many years later, between the 1930s and 1950s, when boat traffic ceased because of the coming of the automobile, combined with World War II and its after-effects. However……

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  1. The canal may have been used for transporting drinking water between Glauchau and Waldenburg. The evidence behind this lies with the aquifers that exist at the dam where the canal starts in Remse combined with the water treatment station located west of Waldenburg, where highways 180 and 175 meet. As dirty as the river was (and still is to a degree today), the filtering complex was built in 1899 by the city of Meerane (west of Glauchau but owns Remse) where the dirt and other debris were filtered out and the water was cleaned of all harmful bacteria.

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To sum up, the canal with the two bridges may have been used as a diversion canal, like the one in Glauchau, for boat passage between Glauchau and Waldenburg or for allowing the flow of drinking water to Waldenburg. The question is which one was used for what. When that is answered, then the question is who was behind both the canal and the two bridges and why?

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You have the answers? You know what to do. For reference purposes, check out the Bridges of Glauchau and Zwickau (links highlighted) where you can read more about the Mulde and how it was tamed by crossings that transported water and diversion canals that protected at least Glauchau from further flooding.

Note: This is both a mystery bridge as well as a mystery infrastructure, hence its post in sister column, The Bridgehunter’s Chronicles.

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Genre of the Week: Are You Lost in the World like Me by Steve Cutts and Moby

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In the past four years, many artists have come up with creative ways to address the audience with issues that we seem to ignore. These include environmental problems, social pathologies- like metal illness and broken relationships, greed and even the development of a concrete form of dystopia, where humans are a cog of a corporation that keeps running day and night, at the expense of our own lives. We’ve seen many documentaries on fracking, the extinction of bees and the perverting of the education system to favor the elite and make the rest become cogs for the corporate machines, done by well known journalists and photographers. But we have seen a steep increase in films and animations from grassroot organizations and people, whose main purpose is to make the situation as gloomy as possible- as a way of sobering society.

Steve Cutts is one of those up-and-coming artists who has been painting the situation as realistic as possible, but through animation. Born in London, Cutts is an illustrator and animator, having produced satires that focus on the faults of modern society. His animations have a combination of very graphic details with a background resembling Mickey Mouse in the 1930s and 40s. The exception is that we are subtracting Disney’s favorite pet with characters who are either greedy, victims of the rapid changes of society or the has-beens- people who had their heyday in the 1970s and 80s but have found themselves washed-up in favor of progress.

The first animation was released in 2012 entitled MAN, which focuses on man’s behavior towards the environment. Using the themes of that plus animal rights, Cutts focuses on how humans abuse the environment for their own gain. Over 20 million views were recorded when the film was released and has been seen by 20-fold ever since. Other animations produced by Cutts can be found on his website by clicking here.

And this takes us to the genre of the week and this animation, Are You Lost. This one deals with our obsession with social networking and the Smartphone. While things are falling apart in our society today, the only comfort is with the device which has hundreds of functions, including selecting the right partner, rewinding to nostalgia, capturing tragedies and finding Pokemon in a sanitary landfill. The worst thing is how our society is decaying because of the need of a small plastic device that is replaceable over people that are not. This includes the child as the main character in the film, who is left out completely because of the people who once they have a device in their hand, there is no return…….

…..or is there? While the music, provided by Moby and the Void Pacific Choir has a gothic taste combined with techno-music, this film looks at the addiction of the Smartphone and how we have become too dependent on it instead of other people. And while other addictions, like drinking, smoking and even being inactive are easy to overcome if we are committed to the task, this one is rather difficult to near-impossible to overcome because of the need to stay connected to people and news, even though they don’t matter to us at home. It is like we care more about the device than the problems that we have to address at home; many of them Cutts addresses here and in all his other films produced up til now. It leads us to the question of whether we can get by without the device for a full day and look at what really matters to us. And if this film is not enough to wake a person up, here’s a situation worth considering:

You see a person in despair, wanting to kill him/herself- like in this film, whose animation is based on the work of Max Fleischer. You have a Smartphone in your hand and are in a deep conversation with someone a half a world away. You see the situation. Do you drop the phone and rush to the person’s aid, or do you watch from the sides and hope someone will do it for you?

It’s easy to be lost in a crowd and let the events unfold as they happen. But sometimes, just switching the phone off and doing something about it will save not just the life of that person, but in the end, your own, as well. Think about it when you watch this…..

 

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Moby (a.k.a. Richard Melville Hall) is an American musician whose specialty is producing electronic music and remixing songs produced by other artists, like Michael Jackson and the B-52s. He gained national fame in the 1990s with the release of the albums Everything is Wrong and Animal Rights, the first of a total of 13 albums that have been released since then. “The Systems Are Failing”  is the latest album to have been released in 2016 and includes the song “Are You Lost in the World, Like Me?” which includes Steve Cutts’ animation. Moby had asked Cutts to produce the film, while the Void Pacific Choir provided the vocals. Moby is a vegan, advocate of animal rights and an environmentalist and has also written essays on these topics as well. He resides in Los Angeles.

 

 

We need to talk……Or should it be chat?- The difference between talk, chat, speak, say and tell

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Imagine this situation: four girls are sitting on a log in the middle of the river, communicating about boys in their lives, philosophy, parents getting on their cases for not doing their chores, teachers’ pets and the like. They sit there for hours on end, letting time fly until one of the girls’ parents hollar their names. Turning around, they see a rather irritated person whose first but most important sentence reads:

“We need to talk, young lady!”

One could also interpret this as:

I need to speak with you.

I have something to tell you.

I have to chat with you about this.

or even

I have something to say to you. 

But is there an underlying difference between say, tell, speak, chat or even talk?

Believe it or not, there is and here’s how:

TELL:

  1. Tell is used to convey a message directly to the person, both in written as well as orally.
  2. Here, we use a person as an object and requires no preposition
  3. Examples:
    1. I have something to tell you.
    2. Did David tell Cara about the news?
    3. Sheila told the teacher that she was late because of a traffic jam.

TALK:

  1. Talk is used to exchange information or have a conversation between two or even more people. It can range from light-hearted conversatio to something serious.
  2. When using a person as a direct object, the preposition of to is needed. Otherwise, as an outsider looking in, with or between is commonly used when looking at two people discussing something. If it involves a theme and not between two people, about is used.
  3. Examples:
    1. Eileen, I want to talk to you about this.
    2. Frank had a talk with Ben about this project
    3. The talk between Dorothea and Carrie bore no fruit.
    4. Stephanie, we need to talk.

SPEAK:

  1. Speak is used in two ways. In the first one, it deals with one-way communication and focuses on serious matters. As the person(s) is the object, the preposition of to is used here. With is also used when talking about what two or more persons spoke about, also in a direct form.
  2. Speak can be used to look at the person’s ability to speak languages. Here, no preposition is needed.
  3. Examples:
    1. Jeremiah, I need to speak to you after class.
    2. The chancellor spoke to the audience about the plan. (Here you can replace speak with address but minus the preposition)
    3. Corrina can speak six languages fluently and is working on her seventh!
    4. The professor spoke with the dean of academic affairs about the complaint today.

SAY:

  1. Say is used to convey an announcement and/or fact and does not address someone directly. Therefore a preposition is not necessary.
  2. If using say directly to a person, the preposition of to is a necessity.
  3. When using say + that, it refers to something being addressed indirectly, although one can forego the luxury if addressing it directly to the person in a form of a command is needed.
  4. Examples:
    1. Matt had something to say to the proposal but didn’t have a chance to say it.
    2. My junior officer has something he wants to say to you.
    3. Mike said that Sara would cover for you while you were away.
    4. I said get that remote control!

CHAT:

  1. Chat can be used as an informal way of discussing a topic- similar to a talk, but most of the time more light-heartedly.
  2. When addressing a person directly, a preposition of with is needed. A topic, it’s about.
  3. Examples:
    1. I hate it when those two chat about nonesense during breaks.
    2. How about a chat over coffee?
    3. You love to chat! I don’t!- When a German says this to you, this is the cue to end the conversation and move on without delay.

 

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Any questions at this point? 🙂

Exercise 1: Complete each sentece with either talk, speak, chat, tell, or say. Please keep in mind that a preposition may be needed in some of them. Also pay attention to the verb tenses, as they are written in either present, past or future (will) tenses.

  1. Chuck __________ Jasmine about the car being sold.
  2. The teacher _________ something about the field trip yesterday.
  3. How about a ________ over a beer at a pub down the street?
  4. I want to _________ you about your grades. I’m worried about you.
  5. The ________ between Crystal and Anna helped solve some key problems.
  6. Martin _________ that the golf course would be hosting the tournament this year.
  7. Why didn’t you __________ me about this? I could have helped you there!
  8. You wanted to __________ to me, Mr. Stone?
  9. Ian ________ you sent the letter off, yesterday. Is that true?
  10. Bridget ____________ you about the project next week.
  11. Dad and Paul _________ the whole night about everything.
  12. Stacey ____________ Marcus about the wedding proposal.
  13. Carolyn ___________the incident on the school bus this morning.
  14. The reporter __________ that the train wreck happened outside of town last night.
  15. I __________ don’t do it, but you did it anyway! Why?

 

Exercise 2: Use the set of words below and conjugate the sentences using speak, talk, say, and tell. Some words need to be added, some omitted.

1. Patty/scholarship/win

2. Holly/Brad/new car/ buy

3. Albert/Charles/becoming a new doctor

4. Conductor/ passengers/ train/ delay (or arrive late)

5. Teacher/ students/ dance/ Saturday night/ take place

 

Exercise 3: In each sentence, there is one error. Find that error and correct it.

  1. I want to say you something, Papa.
  2. I chatted to you to clean your room! Why didn’t you do that?
  3. Patrick spoke at the council about the proposal being bad.
  4. The two gentleman had a great say at the get-together
  5. Mama had a speak with her daughter about the birds and bees.

 

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In School in Germany: The SWOT Analysis, Nostalgia and Football

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You don’t know how old you really are unless you look at your birthday card and see the hits from the 70s, the time you were born! 😉

Youtube has become the hub when it comes to finding some interesting videos for you to see. There are millions of music videos, episodes of TV series, amateurs performing experiments, and even tour guides that people can find and watch to their amusement. This also includes documentaries on historic events, and even sporting events of the past that we rarely see on TV unless you subscribe to Netflix, Uber, Hulu, or cable channels provided by networks charging people high monthly rates.

A couple weeks ago, as events in the United States with Donald Trump as President was beginning to unfold (which has to do with my silence from writing columns), I stumbled across full-length American football games dating back to the 1970s, featuring commercials, commentary by sportscasters and the like. It just so happened that I spent my Sunday evening, absent from watching real football games and Tatort on TV, watching a 1977 playoffs game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Los Angeles Rams, in what was dubbed the Mud Bowl. That game was televised in full length, which included the pre-game, the commercials and the play-by-play. The Vikings won 14-7 in what was one of the sloppiest game in the history of the National Football League and would advance to the NFC Championship game, losing to the Dallas Cowboys in the end. This Vikings’ victory was revenge for an earlier loss in the season.

Here’s the entire game in full length:

 

When watching this game, I came up with a grand idea that might be useful in any classroom setting. Both in America as well as in Europe, we have a sense of nostalgia, where pieces of our past are kept and cherished, while others that disappeared for a long time are recovered for rememberance purposes. Be it an antique cup, a historic building or place of interest, a lost recording of a film, old 70s style clothing or even music, we all have a sense of nostalgia, which we sometimes go back to look at what was then in comparison with what is today- right now. And this media-laden exercise takes us back to the past so we can talk about certain events, what we used to have and should have back at any cost, and what which ones were better off being a fad of the past and not of the future. 😉

SWOT:

Created by Alfred Humphrey in the 1960s, the SWOT Analysis is based on a strategy used by companies and institutions to determine their health and better plan for the future. The letters stand for Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat, each one looking at the capabilities that a person and/or institution have so that they can see them as assets and not as liabilities. 

This activity has a sense of SWOT in there but shaped somewhat differently than what was developed by Humphrey because it focuses on the past-present comparison instead of the present-future scenario.  For S, we would have the assets of the past that were of great value and wish we should have kept; For W, we would have the aspects that were only good for the past and cannot be compatible for the present or future. For the O, we would have the question of whether some aspects of the past could still be instilled in the present or future. And lastly, for the T, we would have anything either from the past that could pose a threat to the future or from the future that would have altered the past had it happened. 

So, use this SWOT analysis and watch this game from start to finish, including the pre- and postgame shows AND ESPECIALLY the commercials. If you use it for a class, you can divide the segments up and give one to a group to analyse.

When watching the game, keep the following aspects in mind:

  1. What were the surroundings? Most football games were played outdoors in the 1970s, and having an indoor stadium (or dome) was considered a luxury compared to today’s games.
  2. How did the people dress and how did they act, behave and communicate with each other and indirectly during those days?
  3. How was the game structured then in comparison to now? Here, some research may be needed to help you answer the question.
  4. How were the commercials marketed? The products featured? The product facts? Would they still be useful in the present?
  5. How were the products and TV show previews presented? 
  6. How was the graphics of the game, the TV shows, the commercials and previews shown?
  7. What controversies in the sportsworld existed during the time of the game. Again, some research may be needed to help support your arguments?
  8. What was the overall environment of the game in the past, compared to the present? 

You can use any full-length game to conduct this SWOT analysis and talk about what was good and should’ve been kept and what still exists today but in altered form. This focuses on not just American football, but soccer, boxing, basketball and even Wide World of Sports.  Most of the games can be found on youtube, just by typing in the key words plus full length. Keep in mind that some leagues, like the NFL, may have their own copyright laws and have pulled full-length classics from these platforms. But not to worry, there are enough full length games to watch and conduct this exercise.

It will take some research but in the end, you will have a chance to enhance your knowledge of English, while learning about the aspects of history, culture, business, media and technology, entertainment and marketing and even the sport itself.  😉

So sit back, have some popcorn and a good Löwenbrau in your hand and enjoy this classic, while using the SWOT to look at the what ifs and what nots. Enjoy!

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Journalist Steve Buttry dies of pancreatic cancer at age 62

This tribute breaks away from the theme of German-American topics but focuses on the meaning of real news and the characteristics of a great journalist. A great journalist is a person who digs for truth, cutting away at the thorns of lies, deception and corruption, sometimes even risking his own life to get at the truth. A great journalist travels to great lengths, learn new cultures and shares his experience with other journalists and columnists who are starting their career or looking for guidance. And in the case of this journalist, he keeps searching for and dishing out real facts for people to think about, despite all odds, all the way to the very end. This Flensburg Files tribute goes out to Steve Buttry, who was unique in many ways. He survived two major cancers and other life-threatening ailments to surpass the feats of journalism that was set forth for him, when he started his career 45 years ago. Seven newspapers, one book, several workshops two blogs, 50 US states visited and hundreds of reported newsstories later, Steve leaves us with not only numerous accolades for his work, a legacy that will be next to impossible to surpass unless you read his work and large footsteps for people, like me to follow, especially in light of the problems we face today, such as fake news, alternative facts and a future that is unknown to this day and can only be changed if we go to the roots, look at the successes of journalists like him and dig for the truth behind the ills we face today or the places we never talk about. But doing it the Buttry Way. This tribute actually is a reblog to the tribute written about him from his own blog. But in either case, we are saluting him for his work, thanking him for what he has done and stand by the people whom he leaves behind with memories of stories and love- standing together so that we can pick up where he left off. God bless you Steve and many thanks for teaching us real journalism.

The Buttry Diary

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Steve Buttry, a journalist for more than 45 years, died February 19 at age 62 of pancreatic cancer, his third major cancer.

A memorial service will be held in coming weeks in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Details are pending and will be posted to this blog and other social media platforms.  The family requests that memorial tributes are directed to a scholarship fund created in Buttry’s honor at the LSU Manship School of Journalism.

Buttry spent most of his career as a reporter and editor, but achieved prominence late in his career as a newsroom trainer, then as an advocate for and teacher of digital journalism and media innovation and finally for blogging openly about his cancer treatment.

His first cancer, colon cancer, was detected early and was cured by surgery in August 1999, when Buttry was a religion reporter and writing coach for the Des Moines Register

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Tour de Revers (Tour of Disappointment): The Cardinal Sin of Biking in Numbers in Switzerland

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Cardinal numbers in English function like ordinal numbers. The lone exception is that they are used to describe sequence, and in some cases, like in this bike race for example, the placing of finishers in a competition. The trick is how the numbers are written, numerically and using just letters. When you look at the table below, you can see the pattern. By mimicking the pattern, especially after passing the 20-mark, it’s a lot easier to learn it and use it. 😉

 

Now for the exercise: 

Martin Quickborn is taking part in his very first Tour de Suisse, a bike racing tour through Switzerland with stops in Zurich, Berne, Biel, Fribourg, Lausanne and ending in Geneva. Tony Crane of the Files‘ Newsflyer, based in Hamburg is doing a recap of the final leg of the tour with a lot of upsets to report.

 With each candidate in reverse order, fill in one blank using the cardinal numbers practiced here (the first and last couple letters are provided as hints),  and using the numbers in parenthesis, write in the cardinal numbers in the other blank. An example is shown below:

 In the Women‘s Division, Maria Eutin came in f_____th behind third place winner Annette Rostock, who finished _______ (34) in last year‘s competition.

 ANS:  fourth (4th) &  thirty-fourth (34th)

 Good luck!  🙂

 

Tony Crane:

Tony Crane live at the Parc de la Grange on the eastern side of Lake Geneva, where this year‘s Tour de Suisse can might as well be the Tour of Upsets, for newcomers and unknowns of this race have become the winners, and the well-knowns have become the nobodys of this race. For example,

 

Last year‘s winner, Francisco Vivaldi of Barcelona finished ___________________(45) in the standings because of an accident with Pierre Dupont, who came in t_______th in the top 10 standings this year. Dupont, who‘s from the French town of St.Julien Genevois finished in ___________(99).  Despite being tarnished by the doping scandal, the Americans managed to place a biker in the top 10 for the _________(12) year in a row. Patrick Simonson from Anchorage, Alaska, who had finished in _________(23) last year, beat Dupont to finish n________th in this year‘s standings. Peter Barker from Liverpool came in e_______th, which was a vast improvement from last year‘s __________ (88) place finish. Then came the s_________th place winner, Jason Colby of Antwerp, Belgium (originally from Saskatoon, Canada), who finished last year‘s race in ____________(15) place, followed by Al Hambra Alla Halla of Cairo, who went from ___________(50) place to s_______th, Gallah Gaddaf of Masdar City in the United Arab Emirates, who bested his finish from ____________(60) to f______th place and local Genevan Mathias DeBruine, who missed last year‘s top ten at ___________(11) to finish in f________th place.  The top three finishers all happen to be Germans, but our f_______st place winner is an unknown. 2012 winner Sebastian Frahm of Munich, who had missed last year‘s race because of a torn Achilles tendon, finished the race in th______d place, falling just two seconds short of s________d place finisher Florian Mielke of Dresden, who finished last year‘s race in ____________(38) place. The winner of this year‘s race was Martin Quickborn, from the northernmost city of Flensburg. He finished f_______st in his very f_______st race on Swiss soil. In his __________(4) as a profi biker, Quickborn had finished between ___________(7) and _____________(10) in his previous nine races and was in ______________(119) prior to this race.

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