The Characteristics of a Great Teacher

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What is a great teacher? What makes a teacher great? What is typical of a great teacher? If there was a secret ingredient to being great, it would be great to know about it. Yet if we knew, and we would try and follow it like textbooks, life would be boring, both in the classroom as well as on the street. Perfectionism would bring out the worst from those who strive for it and those who rebel against it. Life as a teacher would be portrayed as inflexible, intolerant and inhumane.

What is a great teacher? Can we follow the footsteps of those who had once ruled the hallways and classrooms of our school? Or read about their lives as we stumble across them on the sidewalks through monuments and Stolpersteine? Or reminisce about the teachers of our time growing up, over a beer or wine at a class reunion? Some say that our teachers set great examples and play a role in our development, but only a few remain close friends for life.

What makes a teacher great? It’s about what you learned from the teachers you had in school; from those who were close and helped you succeed. It’s about learning from your own personal experiences, remembering the stories told to you while growing up, embracing in your own faith, and developing your passion for the job. Molding it together and being prepared to share them with others.

What is typical of a great teacher? It can be best described as follows:

A great teacher enters the classroom like it’s a concert at Carnegie Hall……

……..and comes away with a standing ovation at the end of class.

A great teacher shows competence in his subject and confidence in his class….

…..and never falters to those who think they are better than he.

A great teacher is communicative, humorous and open-minded….

…..and the same goes to the students if it applied correctly in class.

A great teacher always listens to the needs of others……

…..and finds ways to cater to them.

A great teacher devotes his time and effort in his subject with a passion…..

…..so that the students can do the same when learning it.

A great teacher teaches the students what is good and what is bad in life…..

……and follows these examples, both on and off campus.

A great teacher is a great storyteller……

…..and uses it to teach the students the morals in life.

A great teacher always embraces in new things for the classroom……..

……and is never afraid to part ways with the old.

A great teacher is flexible and spontaneous……..

……and never follows the rules like a textbook.

A great teacher never holds back on his opinions and truths…..

……and is not afraid of the opinions and truths from his students.

A great teacher is always creative and tries new experiement….

…..as long as he and his students profit from them.

A great teacher always makes mistakes in class……

…..and should not be afraid to admit being human.

A great teacher is also a great mentor….

….being the guiding light for those who need it.

A great teacher is always there if the student needs help……

…..whether it’s big or small, in school or outside,

….a  great teacher will always be your friend for life.

And when you have a chance to meet your great teacher- your mentor, friend and all- many years down the road, always remember what he taught you and why he got you to where you are today. After all, what he passed down to you, it’s your job to pass it down to your children of the next generation.

That is what defines a teacher a great teacher. 🙂

 

Author’s note: I had some great teachers growing up in Minnesota, but this one goes out to one who was an elementary school teacher and close friend of the family. I had her for the last two years before entering middle school and we became great friends afterwards. Many people knew her for the characteristics that I’ve pointed out here and it was through these key points where people like me took them and made use of them, both as teachers as well as parents and beyond. In her memory, this one’s for you with many thousands of thanks! 🙂 ❤ 

 

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Speed Limits in Germany: Should they be enforced nationally?

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Entering the Autobahn in Hamburg. Photo taken in March 2017

It is one of the main anchors of German culture. It is a place where you must try when visiting Germany. It is also one where if you don’t know how to take care of yourself, you could end up endangering yourself and others too. It’s the German Autobahn. Introduced over a century ago and expanded during the 1930s, the Autobahn became the quickest way to get from point A to point B. It also became the shortest way to get to your destination. With its famed unlimited speed limits, as seen on the signs, you can get from Munich to Berlin in five hours without any traffic jams; seven when going from Cologne to Dresden. In some cases, travelling by the Autobahn is faster than traveling by train, especially when the Deutsche Bahn (DB) has to handle delays and cancellations on a daily basis. 70% of all Autobahns in Germany do not have a speed limit, whereas speed limits are enforced in blackspots, construction areas and in big cities, and they limit based on the density of traffic on the highways.

Sadly though, it is one of the deadliest places to drive because of reckless driving, disobeying traffic regulations, disregarding other road-users and sometimes, poor conditions on the pavement themselves. In comparison to other European countries, the German Autobahn has the highest fatality rate of all the member states, plus Great Britain. The rate of deaths on the Autobahn per 1000 kilometers is 30.2%, according to data provided by the European Union. The European average is 26.4%. Per billion kilometers, the fatality rate in Germany is 1.6 is double that of Great Britain’s. Comparing that with the US, the fatality rate per mile is still less but the rate may become on par with the Americans in a few years. On 25 of the most dangerous interstate and federal highways in the States, the average death rate is 0.62 per mile. Along the six deadliest, the rate per mile is 0.9!  Given the increase in cars on German Autobahns, combined with distracted driving and even reckless driving, the statistics are sobering.

 

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Attempts were made in January 2019 to introduce a “blanket-style” speed limit on all German Autobahn to ensure that people obey the speed limits. The reason for the proposed enforcement is to ensure that drivers stay within the limit and not race with speeds of up to 250 km/h (in the US: 155 mph.  While this proposal was dead on arrival in the German parliament, it doesn’t mean that it cannot be resurrected at a later time. There are several arguments for and against a nationwide speed limit:

Proponents for the Speed Limit Opponents of the Speed Limit
Other countries in Europe have them: Poland has the 140 km/h limit (85 mph). The Czech Republic, France, the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, and Austria, have the 130 km/h (80 mph) limit (which had been proposed by the German government) Belgium and Switzerland have a 120 km/h (75 mph) limit.

 

A map of the countries with the speed limits can be found above.

The enforcement of the speed limit would increase the cost for mobility in Germany, especially with the subsidies involving e-cars, tax hikes for gas, introducing incentives to replace old diesel cars with newer ones conforming to standards and enforcing a ban on diesel cars in big cities.
“Reducing speed limits would bring down the number of fatalities, which is one in four-“  an argument presented by Michael Mertens, Chair of the German Police Officers Union in an interview with the Süddeutsche Zeitung. Money should be spent on expanding public transportation services, such as trains and busses, as well as bike trails for they provide healthier choices.
He adds further: “By even reducing the speed limit to 130, it would help prevent serious accidents and tailbacks (traffic jams)” To add to his argument: A report showed that 2018 was the worst year regarding traffic jams as over 745,000 were reported, an average of 2000 per day. This was a 3% increase since 2017. The Autobahn is a tourist trap and visitors to Germany would like to experience driving the Autobahn and stop at well-known rest areas and eateries along the way.
Speed limits would reduce carbon dioxide emmissions- in 2017 alone, 115 million tons of CO2 released in the atmosphere in Germany came from cars. The rate has increased steadily since 1990. Reducing the speed on the Autobahn would hurt car sales, especially with the likes of BMW, Audi, Porsche, Volkswagen, etc.

 

A report on mobility was expected to be released at the end of March, outlining the details on how Germany can reduce carbon dioxide emissions without being penalized millions of Euros by the authorities in Brussels. Already the government has come under fire for admitting that its goal of reducing emissions by 8% by 2020 would not be reached due to several factors, including weening itself off of coal by 2038, lacking support for European measures to tackle climate change and the like. Yet the report is expected to include the enforcement of speed limits on Germany’s Autobahn system. While a general speed limit already in place on most streets and two-lane roads, the question is why not introduce it onto German highways, just like in every other state?

This is where the question between culture and conformity come to mind- Are we ready to rein in speeding at the cost of tradition or do we have bigger environmental issues to tackle and speeding “…defies all common sense,” as mentioned by German Transportation Minister, Andreas Scheuer?

 

 

Questionnaire: Should Germany enfore its speed limit on its Autobahn system? If so, what speed is acceptable?

Feel free to vote and also write your thoughts in the comment section. Click on the highlighted links to read more about the speedlimits. 

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fast fact logo 16131_tempolimit_130_km_h_zulässige_höchstgeschwindigkeit:

  1. According to German Traffic Laws, drivers are allowed to speed up to 100 km/h on all roads and 130 km/h on expressways and designated stretches of the German Autobahn. When in town, the speed limit is 50 km/h unless posted. Some speed limits allow for 60 km/h.

60 kph

2. Beware of the magic number! The 60 km/h limit is the most commonly used speed limit in Germany, used on many different occasions. One will find it inside the city,  on speed limit signs designated for trucks (although the maximum speed is 80), and in construction zones- even on Autobahns.  The second most common speed sign is the 70 limit, which is found in cities but is required at all highways intersections.

3.  Blackspots are defined as areas that are most proned to accidents. They can be found construction sites as well as areas along the highway- curves, intersections, built-up areas in the city and other dangerous spots where accidents  most often occur.

 

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Photo Flick 11- Guest Flick

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This photo was taken by Paul Equale on March 9th, 2018 with the following commentary:

Joe Biden took his granddaughter to the movies in Georgetown last night…..on his way out he stopped to speak w/ a homeless man. A bystander took this candid shot. Character is about what you do when no one is watching. 

Joe Biden is one of 18 candidates who is running for US President in 2020. The former Vice President of Barack Obama has had a lot of hardships in recent years but is one of many persons made of steel who is bound to unseat the current President and soon-to-be incumbent, Donald Trump.

This leads to the question of what makes a politician a great one. Feel free to comment. 🙂

 

Fl Fi USA

The History of Christmas Lights- Guessing Quiz

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When Christmas is here, so are the Christmas lights. On the tree, on the houses and even on people, Christmas lights have become the cornerstone to any holiday celebration. For over a century, people have embraced them, cursed at them if things go awry, competed with neighbors for the best lighting and lastly (but most importantly), taken pride in their work of making things twinkle and flash.

Many of us don’t know much about the history of Christmas lighting, despite having materials being written about them. We do know that the invention of electrical Christmas lights came right after Thomas Edison invented the light bulb. Afterwards, the rest was history.

I’ve compiled a quiz on the history of Christmas lighting in the US and beyond, with the goal of challenging you all to guess at the answers and learn about how the Christmas lights have evolved into something where we cannot live without them, especially at Christmas time.

So switch on the bubble lights and set to work on these questions. Good luck and the answers will come before the end of the holiday season! 🙂

Christmas Lights QuizChristmas Lights Quiz 2

Hint to Nr. 10: 

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipP3V_c3-O_SG9iuBSodfR1N4SJ8VfNeIYhgLUOoZmWyf-jysZOea4G7OZa5F-ZDuw?key=ZnoxNUZybFN2UmNpeFlqOWZVdEp0V0g1ZFpFaXB3

 

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FlFi Christmas 2018

To The Donor in Germany With Many Thanks, Wherever You Are.

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David Weringa (left) and Tim Anderson (right), long time friends with much in common. Photo contributed by David Weringa

I would like to start this Holiday Tribute with a quote about friendship which one should keep in mind: “Friends are there when you least expect it.” That means if you are in dire straits and others turn your back, there will be one or a small set of friends, some whom you haven’t seen in years, who will be right there to help you through the hardest of times.

I would like to share this story to one unknown friend out there, who went the extra mile to save the life of another person in the most dire need. And what is special about this story is that the person who helped him lives in Germany. The person, whose life was saved, lives in the US in the State of Minnesota. Specifically, Fairmont, Minnesota, which is located 50 miles west of the nearest city of Albert Lea in the south-central part of the state.

David Weringa works in the restaurant industry and has for many years. A 1991 graduate of Granada-Huntley-East Chain High School, which is east of Fairmont, David used to be a manager of Brickhouse Pizza in Winnebago before moving to Jackson to take a more rewarding job at Pillar’s Restaurant and Grill (which is now known as Bucksnort’s). Jackson is located 30 miles west of Fairmont. He is a friend of a close friend of mine, Tim Anderson, who also lives in Jackson.  He and I were members of a barbershop quartet while in high school, but graduated one year before I did. (I am a 96er). He and David got to know each other while working at Pillar’s in Jackson and became great friends after that. While Tim was working as a bartender, waiter and assistant manager, David was working as the kitchen manager at the restaurant when he suddenly felt severe pain in his legs in the summer and fall of 2016. After several visits to five different hospitals, including the emergency room, combined with several tests, he was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on November 30th, 2016. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the lymphoid line of blood cells characterized by the development of large numbers of immature lymphocytes. Symptoms may include feeling tired, pale skin color, fever, easy bleeding or bruising, enlarged lymph nodes, or bone pain. As an acute leukemia, ALL progresses rapidly and is typically fatal within weeks or months, if left untreated. As many as 876,000 people were affected by ALL in 2015; of which, 111,000 of them died from it. ALL affects mostly children between the ages of two and five, as they account for 50% of all cases. Yet a small number of adults have been infected with it as well.

People like David.

After the diagnosis, David was sent to Sanford Hospital in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where he started chemotherapy. Consisting of eight cycles (1 week in the hospital and two weeks at home), he continued undergoing therapy until 4th of May, 2017. It was not easy for him as he lost 40 pounds in the process, plus he was unable to continue performing his duties at the restaurant he was working; as a consequence, he was forced to resign for health reasons. After the chemotherapy was completed, David was put on maintenance chemo, where doctors could check the progress of the cancer. It was at that point where bone marrow biopsy revealed that the cancer was coming back.  Faced with a life and death situation, the only hope left for him was a bone marrow transplant.

David was referred to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, one of the world’s leading hospitals when it comes to treatments for very rare diseases, combined with state-of-the-art medical research and technology. There, he underwent another form of chemotherapy called Blinotumomab, which targets the cancer cells. After 28 days, the cancer went into remission, yet the hardest battle was yet to come, and it had to do with the bone marrow.

In November 2017, David returned to the Mayo after having spent much of his time at home, where he received the best news ever: doctors had found a bone marrow match on the donor list! 😀  The person who had donated the marrow was a 27-year old person who was living in Germany at the time of the transplant. There was no further information beyond that, nor was it possible to contact the donor for a year after the transplant,  and afterwards, only that person would be allowed to contact David and others. The bone marrow cells from the German were delivered to Rochester on 29 November, 2017 and transplanted into David one day later, which coincided with the one-year anniversary of his diagnosis.

While the bone marrow transplant was a success, David was not out of the woods just yet.  100 days after the transplant, a biopsy in March 2018 revealed that the cancer cells were back and the bone marrow cells were not ready to fight these cells off. As a consequence, David underwent a new targeted chemo, called Inotuzamab, which was supposed to help the new cells take on and defeat the cancer cells, but had very nasty side-effects- namely high fever, rapid heartbeat, tiredness, infections, and the decrease in number of platelets plus other symptoms. In some cases, it could cause liver failure, which is potentially fatal. In David’s case, he needed transfusions of platelets as the numbers were dreadfully low. The average number of transfusions per week, according to his account, ranged between two and seven times. These platelets serve to clot up the flow of blood in areas where a cut or a bruise happened, in order to stop the bleeding instantly. Persons with a low platelet count can experience prolonged bleeding for up to hours on end. As an example, a person with a nosebleed would need five hours or more to stop the bleeding if the count is too low. Normally it is usually between five and ten minutes if the platelet count is normal.

Finally, in June of this year, after being at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester for over a half a year, David was finally able to go home. He has become healthier and stronger than he was when he entered the clinic prior to the transplant, and his cancer has since been in remission. In the interview, he mentioned that his cancer had been in remission for a total of six times during this ordeal, yet, since having left the clinic, the biopsies he has undergone have revealed that the cancer has not come back. For him it was a victory that could not have been achieved if it hadn’t been for that donor in Germany, who took the time to donate a marrow to save another life, namely his.

Donating organs, blood and the like have not been well received in Germany within the past five years. According to the German Organ Transplantation Foundation (DSO), only 797 organ donations were reported in 2017, making it 9.7 persons per 1 million. This is the lowest number since 2017, and Germany is towards the bottom in European standards, with Spain leading the pack with 46.9 donors per one million. Factors include several scandals and the lack of interest in donating even blood have played a key role in the decline, despite increases in numbers in the states of Bavaria, Hesse and Rhineland-Palatinate, according to local.de. Proposals to have organ donations be obligatory after a person’s passing unless noted by the person himself have been rejected soundly because of privacy reasons, yet there are several advantages of donating organs, blood and the like, especially if one is willing to allow for the transplant in order to save the life of another.  Donor cards exist in Germany, where a person can fill out his personal data and submit it to a donor fund, granting them permission to remove the organs and like once the person passes on. This one is quite useful, if a person is like yours truly and believes that even if the person dies, the organs can still be used in someone else, as long as they are useful and working. Therefore, inspite of the scandals and lack of interest, one should have a look at the option of donating carefully and all the benefits that exist.

 

December 2018:

David still lives in Fairmont.  A lot of things are looking up for him ever since the transplant. He’s about to take on a job at Ambiance Tap House and Grill in town as soon as he’s ready. With the cancer in remission for a half a year at least and his health becoming better, he’s ready to take that step in returning to the job that he loves doing, which is working in a restaurant. It has been well over a year since the donor provided him with that bone marrow that saved his life, and David has been very thankful for that.  While the year clause has long since expired, the donor has yet to contact David to see how he is doing. For there has not been any contact, it is the wish of David to send the word of thanks to that donor, for taking the time needed to donate the marrow and save his life. That is even if that donor still wishes to remain annonymous.

And with that, I would like to end this story with a small token in German: “Vielen Dank, dass Sie diese Mühe gegeben haben, um das Leben eines Menschen wie David retten zu können. Es war das beste Geschenk, das Sie ihm gegeben haben. Dank Ihnen, kann er sein Leben weitermachen und mit vielen Freuden.”  The best present comes when the person least expects it. ❤  🙂

Special Thanks to David Weringa for providing the details to this long story and wishing him all the best.

 

 

Sunset over Flensburg

FlFi Christmas 2018

Guessing Quiz: Thanksgiving and Food in the USA

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Today is Thanksgiving in the United States. It’s a special day where people gather to reflect on the year and appreciate what they have and have achieved. While the holiday is celebrated in other countries, such as Canada, Germany and other European countries, they take place earlier and have their own customs that are different to what Americans are accustomed to. Aside from having the turkey and stuffing, what else is typical of this holiday?

To find out, I’ve compiled a Guessing Quiz for you to try and test your knowledge. It’s multiple choice but only one answer is possible.  Good for just about any place. Let’s start with the first question:

1. What is so special about Thanksgiving?
a. It marks the anniversary of the ratification of the US Constitution in 1787
b. It’s a day of giving thanks
c. It’s the last day before the fasting period starts.

 
2. When did the first Pilgrims arrive?
a. 1620
b. 1863
c. 1621
d. 1815

 
3. Where did the first Pilgrims originate from?
a. Norway
b. Germany
c. Spain
d. England

 
4. Where did the Pilgrims land?
a. Virginia
b. Massachusetts
c. New York
d. Delware

 
5. Who led the expedition and later became the mayor of the first settlement?
a. William Bradford
b. Giovanni de Verrazano
c. Hernando Cortes
d. Francisco Coronado

 
6. Which Indian chief helped the settlers establish their foothold on their
community and later helped commemorate the Thanksgiving celebration?
a. Massasoit
b. Dances with Wolves
c. Crazy Horse
d. Sitting Bull

 
7. When was Thanksgiving permanently declared a national holiday?
a. 1863
b. 1865
c. 1918
d. 1783

 
8. Which US President proclaimed Thanksgiving a national holiday?
a. Theodore Roosevelt
b. Abraham Lincoln
c. William McKinley
d. Andrew Johnson

 
9. Which of the foods served is NOT typical of Thanksgiving? Mark only one.
a. Turkey
b. Mashed Potatoes
c. Sweet Potatoes
d. Cranberry sauce
e. Pumpkin Pancakes
f. Pumpkin Pie

 
10. What sport is the most popular to watch on Thanksgiving?
a. Basketball
b. Football
c. American Football
d. Professional Wrestling
e. Ice Hockey
f. Handball
g. Curling

 

As a bonus, I’ve included a quiz on American food in order to determine what you can find in the States.  And while some of them can be found in Europe, it’s not as popular as when you find along the store shelves. Good luck in this version:

  • What is a Smorgasbord?
    • An “all-you-can-eat restaurant
    • A Norwegian sandwich
    • Food that is sold at a convenient store

 

  • What is a potluck dinner?
    • A meal that is cooked in a big pot
    • Whoever is lucky gets to eat first
    • An event where everyone can bring some food and drink to share with others

 

  • What is egg nog?
    • Another word for pancake
    • A drink consisting of eggs, milk/cream, sugar, spices and sometimes alcohol (mainly rum)
    • A sweet bread with eight eggs.

 

  • Egg nog translated into German would be similar to which drink?
    • Eierpunsch
    • Eierlikör
    • Eieradvokaat

 

  • What does a yam refer to?
    • People whining
    • People enjoying food
    • Sweet potato

 

  • Jell-O in America is a special pudding. What is it, exactly?
    • Créme Brulette
    • Wiggle-Pudding (Wackelpudding in D)
    • Creme pudding

 

  • What ingredient does NOT go into chili con carne?
    • black beans
    • corn
    • tofu

 

  • Which main dish is universally served for the holidays, regardless of which one?
    • Hamburger
    • Turkey
    • Roast Beef

 

  • Root beer is referred to which type of drink?
    • Dark beer
    • Light beer with 10% alcohol
    • A sweet drink flavored with roots and different spices

 

  • Smores is what kind of desert?
    • Ice cream shake
    • Sandwich with a melted marshmallow and chocolate on a graham cracker
    • Oreo sandwich with ice cream.

 

Flags

The Flensburg Files and sister column The Bridgehunter’s Chronicles wish you a Happy Thanksgiving and a wonderful start into the holiday season!

 

Author’s note: The graphic above is courtesy of Tracy Nelson, who was famous for her role at Sister Steve in the Father Dowling Mysteries

 

Fl Fi USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers to Part 1:

  1. b,  2. c, 3. d, 4. b, 5. a, 6. a, 7. a, 8. b, 9. e, 10. b

Answers to Part 2:

  1. a, 2. c, 3. b, 4. c, 5. c, 6. b, 7. c, 8. b, 9. c, 10. c

Buß- und Bettag: Saxony’s Version of Memorial Day…… Or is it?

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In America, we have two different types of memorial days- Memorial Day itself, which honors those who passed on, and Veteran’s Day, which honors and also memorializes those who fought in all the wars that the US has been involved in to date.  The first one takes place on the last Monday of every May and is considered a statutory non-working holiday. There, flowers are lain on the graves of those lost. Parades honoring the fallen and church services are held on that day.  Veteran’s Day was introduced over 100 years ago as part of the Treaty of Armistice, thus declaring World War I officially over on the 11th of November, 1918 at the 11th minute of the 11th hour. Governmental offices and most businesses and schools are closed on that day, pending on the individual state’s guidelines,  and the holiday is celebrated in many ways- be it parades or other ceremonies, public addresses or other civil gatherings.

In Germany we have one holiday that has the equivalence to Memorial Day but has, as one person had put it in an interview, become a long-forgotten holiday.  Buß und Bett Tag, known as the Day of Repentance and Prayer if translated into English, was first introduced by the Kingdom of Prussia in 1878 and got its origins from the days after Martin Luther’s Reformation in 1532 as Emperor Charles V proclaimed, at the behest of the Protestants, to commemorate the Ottoman conquest of the Holy Roman Empire in 1354. When the Prussian Empire succumbed to the German Empire in 1871, the day was later adopted in all of the newly-formed German states, where the Day of Prayer was to take place either 11 days before the first Advent and/or before the 23rd of November- as originally declared during Prussia’s existence.  That day was abolished in 1934 by Hitler and was only partially lifted in the 1960s, where only the western half celebrated it and the eastern half was banned from celebrating it by the SED_dictatorship.

It was not until 1990 when a newly-reunified Germany reintroduced it to all the states, but only temporarily. In 1994, the government under Kohl introduced a bill to reform the health care and social security system, requiring more payments into the system and people to work more hours. As part of the package, all the federal states voted to add a day onto the working schedule, hence the elimination of Buß und Bett Tag.

All of them except Saxony.  In Bavaria, it is still a working holiday but the children have the day off from school.

While Buß und Bett Tag is practiced today in those two states, there are many theories as to how people still interpret this day. It is a non-working holiday in Saxony, going by the proclamation by the book, yet the residents are required to pay 13-15% more into the health care fund for that day. When asked what people do on that day, the response: We travel to the Czech Republic, or to the neighboring states because there are businesse open there.

Has Buß und Bett Tag become the long-forgotten holiday, as forgotten as the Sunday ritual of going to church? I decided to find out how it is celebrated to this day. Being a member of a church choir for the day, I earned a free pass to see how the holiday is observed, and this is what I found:

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It turns out, Buß und Bett Tag is not only the time to remember the people who died, but it is a time of reflection of our own past actions and what we can do to right the wrongs done onto others. Pending on which church a person attends in Saxony, the holiday brings people together for over an hour of church service. Yet in other cases, concerts are added to the mix, using songs that honor the people and their relationship with the Lord.  At a church in Zwickau, the congregation was treated to a short skit in connection with the Lost Son (the book of Luke 15:11-32)  but in modern form, followed by a sermon on how forgiveness and reconciliation far outweigh the sins committed onto others. Lessons on how to treat others well despite their backgrounds reinforce the meaning of the holiday  in terms of reflection.  At a church in Glauchau, a choir concert, featuring two choirs and an orchestra, rocking to the tunes of John Rutter and Antonin Dvorak honor the dead and those retiring from the years of hard work, thus stressing the meaning of the holiday in terms of honor.

Still, the number of people participating in these events are relatively small, running parallel to the problems America is currently facing with a decline in church attendance and the forced consolidation of two or more congretations.  And while the majority of church-goers in the US are over 50 years of age, in Germany, there seems to be an even proportion of people paying respects to the Lord, including families (especially with children), friends and strangers.  From the view of the majoirty, when looking at the scene on this day, one can see children playing, families catching up on housework and even small businesses doing overtime to set up the huts for the Christmas market, which starts on the following weekend in the first Advent.  Despite this trend, it does not mean one needs to follow the suit of the other states by “getting with the program” and abolishing this sacred day.  Granted unions have been striving to push for the abolition of extra pay into the health care and pensioner’s fund citing its irrelevance to today’s standards.

Judging from my observations, having a day like Buß und Bett Tag could be a blessing even if it is considered the official day of rest. Most countries in the western hemisphere have a special day commemorating the living and the dead, honoring them for their work. If each state in Germany was to follow what is being followed in Saxony, it would serve as an opportunity for all people to honor and pay tribute to those who deserved it, pray for those who are in need (and find ways to help them), and repent for the sins done onto others (and again find ways to forgive them).  One doesn’t need to have a fancy ceremony, like parades and the like, as seen in Memorial Day celebrations, but simply church services, charitable events and concerts with the themes of reflection and tribute, as seen here in Saxony. Anything more than that would be considered overkill.

Many of us seem to forget the real meaning of family and friendship, respecting and honoring some and helping others because we are all consumed by work, individual gratification and materialistic items. In fact some holidays, like Christmas and Easter have become so materialistic and sometimes ignored, that their underlying meanings have become very irrelevant.  When we think of only Father Christmas/ Santa Claus/ Der Weihnachtsmann and the presents we receive from them, then it is time to reexamine ourselves and look at the real meaning of these holidays, which means the life of Christ, and the meaning of the people in our lives whom we care about.

Therefore, we should keep this day of remembrance and reflection, so that we can remember the people who made a difference in our lives, reflect on what we have done and what we should do differently and especially, reconsider some things in our lives because of the potential for failure. Buß und Bett Tag has a much thorougher meaning than what has been perceived. It’s not just a day of rest, but a day to look back and look forward. While Germany has many holidays, these holidays are meant for a time of rest, reflection, reunions and gatherings and refueling ourselves for work. By eliminating even one day for the purpose of work,  we take away more than that day to spend it for ourselves and our families and friends.  Therefore, when having another day like this one in the future, think about what we have and what we have done (or should be doing). A little time of reflection and remembrance will help a person go an even longer way.

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The biblical origin of this day stems from the book of Jonah, which states the following:

And Jonah began to enter into the city a day’s journey, and he cried, and said, Yet forty days, and Nineveh shall be overthrown. 5So the people of Nineveh believed God, and proclaimed a fast, and put on sackcloth, from the greatest of them even to the least of them. 6For word came unto the king of Nineveh, and he arose from his throne, and he laid his robe from him, and covered him with sackcloth, and sat in ashes. 7And he caused it to be proclaimed and published through Nineveh by the decree of the king and his nobles, saying, Let neither man nor beast, herd nor flock, taste any thing: let them not feed, nor drink water: 8But let man and beast be covered with sackcloth, and cry mightily unto God: yea, let them turn every one from his evil way, and from the violence that is in their hands. 9Who can tell if God will turn and repent, and turn away from his fierce anger, that we perish not? 10And God saw their works, that they turned from their evil way; and God repented of the evil, that he had said that he would do unto them; and he did it not

Jonah 3:4-10

 

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