Holiday Genre: Schweddy Balls

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As we look back at the holiday season, I found a few genres that are worth mentioning and also worth using for the next holiday season. Our first one features a flashback to  December 1998 and the parody of National Public Radio produced by Saturday Night Live, based in New York City. Since its first show in 1970, SNL has produced some of the best parodies and series on record, making people laugh until they either cried or peed their pants. This scene comes from the NPR parody series “The Delicious Dish,” (based on the real NPR’s The Splendid Table) with a splendid name to kick off the holiday spirit. It even made the Rolling Stones Magazine’s Top 20 of SNL’s All Time Best List at Nr. 20! Enjoy! 🙂

 

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Black Friday: The Bright Side to Christmas Shopping- Guest Column by Josh Wardini

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Thanksgiving in America is right around the corner. And with that comes the turkey, football, family and friends, giving thanks for a successful year, and lastly,

HOLIDAY SHOPPING!!! 🙂

With Thanksgiving comes Black Friday, which is the start of the holiday shopping season. Running parallel to the Christmas markets that will start at the end of November in Germany, Europe, parts of the US and elsewhere, Black Friday is where families and friends line up early in the morning on the Friday after to get the best deals on gifts.

I have written a great deal about the downsides of Black Friday- namely retails taking advantages of people lining up even on Thanksgiving to enter stores at midnight- or earlier- there are some reasons and even advantages behind Black Friday.

Josh Wardini presented some facts and figures about this culture in hopes that the readers will understand the culture of after-holiday, or should I say in-between holiday shopping. This needs no further explanation as this guest writer, who is a Community Manager at Webmaster’s Jury will present you the culture and history behind this American phenomenon, something that is still unknown to people in Europe and elsehwere.

Enjoy and stay tuned, the Christmas market tour and some history are just around the corner! 😀

source: shopping.fm

 

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Genre of the Week: The Man Who Hated Christmas by Nancy Gavin

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What comes to mind when you think of Christmas? The tree? The market? Santa Claus? Presents? What aspect of Christmas do you like the most? For me, Christmas is about donating time, money and energy for a cause that is deep in the heart and one that has an everlasting effect on the community, whether it is helping out at the church on a Sunday, doing a fundraiser to help find a cure for cancer, working in a homeless shelter or even singing for money to be donated to a worthy cause. All of these we have done over the holidays because we know what it is like to either have witnessed certain events in our lives or know someone who has experienced hardships. Christmas is more about what you and heart and soul can do for others in the community and not about shopping for the largest gifts.

This is the central theme of this Genre of the Week entitled The Man Who Hated Christmas by Nancy Gavin. Originally published in the Women’s Day Magazine in December 1982, the story was based on the concept of the White Envelope in the Christmas tree, where as a gift to the family, one member donates her time, money and energy in donating to the right cause. The result was turning a sad face of a man who disliked Christmas because of the materialism involved into one who turned up the corners- way up- and hence, the project was launched, which has been going strong ever since. Gavin died two years after the story was published, but the white envelope tradition continues to this day. You can learn more about it by clicking here.  A youtube version of the story is here for you to learn why Christmas is important in ways that make that next computer, flatscreen TV and robot look like a thing to be left on the shelf. Listen to the story and then go out and do something for the community, not just this holiday season but also beyond. Enjoy! 🙂

 

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Black Friday- The Start of Christmas Shopping

Author’s Note: This is a Throwback article dating back to 2013. Black Friday is the day where Christmas shopping starts, which is the day after Thanksgiving. Yet the author has been quite critical of this tradition as you can see below. A pair of additional links that you didn’t see in the original areavices version of the article are provided at the end of the article. Enjoy! 🙂

Thanksgiving in America: A day of giving thanks. A day of spending time with family and friends. A day of feasting on turkey, stuffing and the like and watching football. A day to go shopping.

SHOPPING?!!  

Not quite. Thanksgiving is the the day before the start of the Christmas Shopping season, the day that is called Black Friday, because that is where many retailers provide the best deals for people to go shopping, so much that many of them would line up in front of the stores for hours until the doors open and people get what they are looking for.  But aside the fact that we finished celebrating our 150th Thanksgiving (President Abraham Lincoln declared the day a national holiday in lieu of the Gettysburg Address in 1863) plus the fact that the holiday is being shared with the Jewish holiday Haunakah this year, a first in at least two generations, this year’s Thanksgiving will go down in history as the holiday where people stood up to the retailers and said “No!” to shopping on that day.

While there had been a trend going in the last couple of years, where stores open in the evening of Thanksgiving, many of them, most notably Target and Wal-mart, plus some malls in America tried to open during the afternoon of this sacred holiday, at the dismay of many who just want to celebrate with friends and family. This trend goes away from the tradition I was used to, when growing up: where Black Friday started at 9:00am, in some cases (albeit a bit extreme), 6:00am.

Many people in other countries could not believe it. Some are of the assumption that it is typically American to consume around the clock. If that was the case, this whole world would be covered in plastic, and we would become the scapegoat. But deep down, the majority of Americans have stood up to the corporates, saying no to working or even shopping on Thanksgiving. Many of them look at us expats as examples and are envious. In Germany, despite having one Sunday open for shopping per month, all stores are closed on Sundays AND holidays, both religious as well as national. We close on the day of German Reunification (3 October), Pentecost weekend, Good Friday through Easter Monday, Epiphany and even on religious holidays in places like Bavaria, Saarland and Saxony Anhalt. This is just to name a good few. And there is a reason: we tend to use these days as the day of rest, going by the book in accordance to Genesis.  These are the days where streets like this one above are empty. It is unlikely that stores would be open on these days and the streets would be filled to the brim, because many of us want to spend time with family and friends, grilling food and feasting on what is typical for these holidays.

And that is why, despite attempts of the German government to provide exceptions to the rule, that we intend to keep our holidays and put the stores in check, forcing them to respect the wishes of the customers. This has resulted in Americans embracing the European culture in that aspect, for despite having 11 holidays where there is no work and the stores are closed (at least many), they really don’t have much time to spend except at the computer desk or on the road.  If we end up flocking into stores like the one below, only the corporates will be happy because of the profits, but not the Americans.

And this takes us back to Thanksgiving and Black Friday, with a bit request to the corporates. Despite your attempts to keep your business running and increase profits, you are actually losing your customers in the long run, because you do not listen to them. Perhaps you should take a look at the holidays and their true meaning. Look at what other countries are doing and how they have profited from them. Adapt to the needs of the customer. Sometimes just returning to the old tradition of having Black Friday beginning at 9:00am helps a great deal, instead of having stores open on Thanksgiving or any day.  Holidays are meant to be the Day of Rest. The Day of Celebration. The Day for Family and Friends. So before the next holiday comes along, why don’t you think about that and make the changes that satisfy everyone?

For those who want to know more about Thanksgiving, a link is provided here.

The origin of Black Friday, believe it or not, came from President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s plan to move up Thanksgiving in 1942. More on that here.

Another critical article from the author on Black Friday and the desparate attempt to open stores on Thanksgiving even is here.

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