RWE Out of Profi German Soccer

Ariel view of Steigerwald Stadium, home of Rot-Weiss Erfurt. Photo taken in 2007 by Tom Kidd for WikiCommons

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Professional Soccer Team shuts down after failure to find Investor to save the Team.

ERFURT, GERMANY- “I died twice this week. This is especially hard. We’ll Need everything to cope with this.” These were the comments from Robin Krüger in an interview with the Thüringen Allgemein Newspaper after learning the fate of the traditional soccer team in the capital of Thuringia on Tuesday.  After struggling to find an investor to  keep the team running, since filing for bankruptcy in 2018, and failing even with the last-minute attempt to find a solution, the profi-soccer team Rot-Weiss-Erfurt is officially no more. The announcement to de-register the team from the Regionalliga Nord was made by the insolvency administer Volker Reinhardt yesterday afternoon at 3:00pm and was made official shortly afterwards. As a consequence, all games played by the team to date have been annulled and Erfurt is the first team to be demoted down to the Oberliga, the fifth league in the German soccer league food chain. That league features mainly teams from Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia, in comparison to the other league, which features teams from the whole northeastern corner of Germany- which used to be East Germany.

The team’s misfortunes began in March 2018, when the team filed for receivership due to a lack of funding and investors. At that time, Erfurt was in the 3rd National League of the German Football Federation (DFB) and as a consequence, it was relegated to the Regionalliga Nord, effectively ending a 10-year run on the national level. It was hoped that with the new start in the league and with the creation of a limited corporation run by an investor found at that time, the team could return to national prominence. Unfortunately, towards the end of last year, the investor was unable to pay the players and head coach, resulting in them pulling out. Reinhardt attempted to look for help through other investors and even the City of Erfurt, neither of them were successful.

With the folding of the profi-soccer team, the remaining soccer players would have a chance to find another soccer team to play the remaining 2019/20 season. At the same time, the Rot-Weiss Erfurt organization can work on a new concept to eliminate a deficit of over 1 million Euros they are facing at present without being liquidated. The last team that was liquidated was Sachsen Leipzig, which happened in 2012. It also had played in the Regionalliga but never had the taste of national football as Erfurt had, during its 55-year history, which includes two seasons in the second tier of the German soccer league since 1990. Furthermore, Rot-Weiss Erfurt had one stint in the UEFA in 1991. On the state level, it had been on par with FC Carl Zeiss Jena in the Thuringia Cup for over a decade, playing for the cup. Prior to that, it had played in the East German Oberliga, having won two seasonal championships and finishing second in the East German Cup in 1980, losing to its cross-state rival, Carl Zeiss Jena.

The loss of Rot Weiss Erfurt is a bitter one for those who have followed the team through the years and watched the rivalry with Jena, the lone Thuringian team still playing on the national level in the 3rd league as of present. Every Saturday, the city center would be plastered with red and white banners, the main colors of the soccer team, with loyal supporters of the team flocking to Steigerwald Stadium, located on the south end of the city in the Governmental District (Regierungsviertel). This will be missed, along with the games that made the crowd scream and the city heard.

With the folding of the soccer team, there is a glimmer of hope for RWE as it starts at the very bottom. The organization can build a new team to play in the Oberliga come next season, assuming there is enough capital. They can still play in the Steigerwald Stadium, which will be a blessing. The youth club (Nachwuchszentrum) will remain for now, as the youth can learn to play soccer. It will be the same youth that will carry the name Rot Weiss Erfurt if they survive the worst of times as they are doing right now. For the city set to host the German Garden Show (BUGA) in 2021, Erfurt and soccer go together like bread and butter. It’s just not the same without RWE, let alone profi-soccer, something we will not see for a while.

 

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Erfurt has not been the lone city suffering from soccer misfortunes. Another Regionalliga rival, Wacker Nordhausen, filed for insolvency in November after carrying a massive debt the Team could not handle. It received a nine-point penalty and could also face a demotion if there is no plan to save the team. FC Carl Zeiss Jena is on the brink of going down to the Regionalliga after a very poor performance during the soccer season. It currently is in last place.

LINKS:

Information on Rot-Weiss-Erfurt can be found here:

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/FC_Rot-Wei%C3%9F_Erfurt

As well as the folding of the club:

https://www.mdr.de/sport/fussball_rl/rot-weiss-erfurt-muss-spielbetrieb-einstellen-100.html

 

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Newsflyer: 11 June, 2014

Unknown photographer. Used in connection with article found here: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/lwx/lightning/va-lightning.htm Public Domain

Giant Storm Causes Widespread Damage throughout Germany.  World Cup in Brazil in Full Gear.  Hamburg SV Handball Team Finished?

Getting off the train this morning at Erfurt Central Station in central Thuringia, passengers received a shock of their lives, as the sounds of thunder and lightning made the state capital sound like warfare going on. Pick any war in the last 20 years and it was reenacted by mother nature. And this in addition to heavy rains that flooded streets and brought the vehicular infrastructure to a complete standstill for a time.  But this was the overture to the series of storms that occurred over the course of two days, ending today, which is comparable to Hurricane Kyrill in February 2007, and caused severe damage throughout all of Germany. More on that and a pair of sports-related items in the Files’ Newsflyer.

Video of the Storm

Kyrillian-sized storm cripples Germany:

Local Flooding in Cologne, Rostock and Berlin. Downed trees in the Ruhr River area, northern Hesse and Saxony-Anhalt. Train services suspended. Power outages everywhere. This was a familiar sign when Kyrill brought all of Germany to a complete standstill in 2007. Yet with the storm system sweeping through Germany yesterday and today, it brought back memories of the event. Sweltering heat gave way to golfball-sized hail, high winds and torrential downpour that caused critical damage to many cities throughout Germany. Fallen trees and flooding caused several raillines to suspend services, including the hardest hit area, the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia, where the German railways suspended all services statewide yesterday for the fourth time since 2007. Officials there are predicting services to return to normal by the weekend. Stations in Essen, Dusseldorf and Cologne were cut off from the rest of the rail network. Raillines between Berlin, Hamburg and places to the north and west were either closed down or rerouted. Over 100,000 travelers were stranded or had to find alternatives, which didn’t fare better with motorways being blocked due to downed trees and other objects.  Damage is estimated to be more than $135 million. News sources are predicting a clean-up effort taking up to more than a week to complete; this includes restoring the infrastructure affected by the storm. More information and photos can be found here.

Hamburger SV Handball Team to Fold?

Once deemed as the one of the powerhouses of German handball, especially after winning the Champions League Title last year, the handball team from Hamburg’s days as a Premere League team may be numbered. Faced with a 2.7 million Euro deficit (ca. $4.4 million), no president since the resignation of Andreas Rudolph in May and with that, the team’s main sponsor withdrawing its financial support, the team was denied entrance to the first and second leagues. Its last attempt to save face and be allowed to play next season in the Premere League is to overturn the decision by the German Handball League through the arbitration panel. The decision should take place on Wednesday. Should the panel uphold the decision or Hamburg withdraw its appeal, the team will be forced to play in the Regional League (3rd League) in the next season. In addition, the team will not be allowed to participate in the European Cup in the next season, despite finishing fourth in the standings. Melsungen would replace the spot left vacant. And lastly, the team will most likely file for bankruptcy, which could lead to the club being liquidated, should no one step in with money to help them. Such a free fall would be catastrophic, as Hamburg has competed well against the likes of the 2014 Season and German Cup champions, THW Kiel, as well as Berlin, Rhine-Neckar Lions, and the 2014 Champions League winners, SG Flensburg-Handewitt. More information can be found here.

World Cup begins tomorrow

Germany and the US are two of 32 teams that will go head-to head with the competitors beginning tomorrow. The 2014 FIFA World Cup will take place in Brazil at 12 several locations, with the Championship to take place on July 13th in Rio de Janeiro. For the first time since 1930, all the teams winning a World Cup will participate in the competition (Argentina, England, France, Italy, Spain, Uruguay, and Germany).  Spain is the returning champion, having edged the Netherlands in the 2010 Cup. This is the fifth time the Cup is taking place in South America, which has been won by teams from that continent the last four times. That means Brazil is the heavy favorites to take the Cup. More interesting is the pool play, in particular, Group G, where the US and Germany are in. They are scheduled to meet on 26 June in Recife. The stakes are high for the head coaches of both teams, who are both looking for their first World Cup title. Jurgen Klinnsmann is being criticized for the American team being Europeanized, which could be his downfall if his team does not make it. Joachim Loewe is hoping that winning the title will improve his chances of a contract extension before 2016. With both teams hobbling with players banged up from regular season competition, it will be interesting to see how the match will turn out, let alone, who will go far in the Cup. More on the Cup to come in the Files. If you want to know more about the tournament, click here for details.

The Problem with Soccer in Germany Part 1: Overview

People have their favorite sports that they love to watch. In the US we have our traditional sports of baseball, football, ice hockey and basketball, but we also have our state-of-the-art type of sports as well, like bungee jumping, skateboarding, karate, etc.  In Germany we have handball, basketball and especially soccer. Why especially? Like in other European countries, we take to soccer like church-goers take to the Bible. We watch the German Bundesliga games every Saturday and Sunday and for many, they become emotionally attached to their favorite teams. Yet the events that have occurred in the last two weeks have raised the question of whether German soccer has become a dysfunctional sport, where the relationship between the fans and the soccer teams have become as frigid as the Winters of 2009/10 and 2010/11 respectively, where money is the determining factor to keeping an elite team in the elite league, and cities that deserve to be in the Upper House have been denied and others with financial and management issues should be relegated to a local soccer team to be cleansed of their troubles. Professional players are emigrating to other countries and the most disturbing development is the fan behavior at the soccer games, which has reached the point where a potential disaster is in the making, waiting to strike at a moment’s notice without any way of averting it.

The Flensburg Files will present a series on The Problem with German Soccer, which will focus on the following topics that will be presented during the summer months with some solutions on the part of the author, based on information collected both written and orally. Here are some topics that will be presented that will provide the audience with an opportunity to look at the problems facing soccer in Germany and its potential to spread to other places where the sport has established a fan base, like the US and Canada, as well as those in southern and eastern Asia and parts of Africa, just to name a few:

The Fan Problem: In light of the recent events this past season in places, like Rostock,  Düsseldorf, Karlsruhe and Frankfurt, fan rowdiness has taken new forms to a point where the teams are having difficulty controlling them and the German Soccer League (DFL)’s attempts of sanctioning them have proven futile. This segment will feature the gravity of the situation and present some solutions to make soccer a fun and safe sport to watch.

The Financial Problem: In order to host games in the upper leagues, teams have to have sufficient liquidity in order to compete. Yet in recent years, teams are having problems coming up with financial support in order to even survive. Using the examples of Hansa Rostock and TuS Koblenz this segment will focus on the problems facing these teams and how they are struggling to survive.
The Management Problem: Tied in together with the financial difficulties the soccer teams face, this segment will focus on ways teams can effectively manage themselves without having to change personnel.

The East-West Problem: It is amazing that after 22 years we still have this issue even in sports. Here, we will focus on the difficulties of the soccer teams in eastern Germany (the former GDR) keeping up with the western counterparts.

And lastly, we’ll look at cities of the past and present whose soccer teams have risen and fallen from the top. This has been divided up into three segments: The shooting stars, The fallen stars, and The Has-beens- meaning the teams that used to be powerhouses in the past but have since been a memory.

The goal is to address these problems to the public and encourage ways to support German soccer in a positive way and make this a sport for people to watch and have fun. This includes encouraging good sportsmanship and stressing the importance of solidarity in the sport. After all, German soccer is a very popular sport that many people around the world watch and it would be a shame to see its reputation tarnished due to its destructive patterns that we have seen in recent times, some of which has a recipe for disaster if they persist without any concrete measures to stop them.


As we are still on the same page, here are some interesting events, most of which will be mentioned in the series:

Dortmund grabs a double.  For the first time ever in the history of German soccer, the soccer team Borussia Dortmund won a double championship. It had won the German Erstliga Title two weeks before thanks to some key victories over Bayern Munich, Mönchengladbach and Schalke, just to name a few. On 13 May, it completely swept the series against Bayern Munich in the German Cup (German: DFB Pokal) but in a fashionable way: a 5-2 spanking over the team which had won seven out of the last 15 cups and won the regular season title nine times since 1997. Congratulations to Jürgen Klopp and his team for accomplishing a monumental task.

Podolski goes to Arsenal (London). One of the key players of the 2010 German soccer team as well as the German team FC Cologne, Lukas Podolski signed an unlimited contract at an undisclosed amount to play for Chelsea in the British Premier League beginning next season. The move was perfect timing as Cologne finished second to last in the standings and therefore must play in the second league in the 2012/13 season. Arsenal London has won 13 Premier League Titles (including the last one in 2003/04) and holds the record for being in the Top 5 standings of the Premere League, it has just finished its 16th straight season near the top. Podolski started his career at Cologne before going to Bayern Munich in 2006 and played for three seasons before returning to Cologne.

Hansa Rostock saved from bankruptcy. Once the darling of soccer in eastern Germany and the last team to win the soccer title and the national cup for the now defunct East Germany (GDR) in 1991, Hansa Rostock used to plague many traditional soccer teams until it faced financial trouble and was forced to relegate in the second and third leagues. On 9 May, the Rostock City Council voted unanimously for a financial package to provide partial debt relief for the beleaguered soccer team, whose debt had soared to 8.5 million Euros. At the same time, a financial shot of 750,000 was given to the team to play in the Third League in the coming season as the team finished dead last in the Second League. Had the city council voted against the measure, the team would have been forced to file for bankruptcy, which would have resulted in an automatic relegation into the fourth or fifth league. Worst case would have been the team being liquidated, which would not have been the first time it had happened. Saxony Leipzig, which had played mostly in the fifth league since its inception in 1991, was liquidated last year as it was unable to support itself financially. In addition, Bayern Munich, one of Rostock’s archrivals in the Erstliga, will travel to the city to face the team in a benefit soccer game sometime in 2013.

Relegation Games end with a bang! Sanctions being considered. In the first three tiers of the German Bundesliga, there is a relegation game where the team finishing third to last in an upper league takes on the team finishing in third place in the league lower than that. The concept has worked wonders since 2010 but this year’s relegation games have come at a price. For the first time in 15 years, Jahn Regensburg (which played in the third league) and Fortuna Düsseldorf (which played in the second league) are being promoted to the second and first leagues after downing Karlsruhe SC and Hertha BSC Berlin respectively. However both games were overshadowed by violence, fireworks, and in the game between Berlin and Düsseldorf, fans running onto the field with two minutes left in the game forcing the referees to stop match for 20 minutes. The DFB is investigating each incident and sanctions are pending. The two incidents are part of a list of other incidents which has plagued the 2011/12 season and has forced the DFB to look into tougher guidelines for fan behavior in general. More on that in the next article on the problem with German soccer.