Why German is a beautiful language

44593775_2117090551654916_5586565529293815808_o (1)

Picked up this rather interesting set of “word-for-word” translations going from Germany into English with both the literal as well as the actual meanings from one of the German facebook sites. Something to ponder, or even laugh about. Whatever type of humor you have. 😉  Enjoy! 😀

thinking-face_1f914

53543271_10157362247272269_4640917583023833088_n

flefi-deutschland-logo

The History of Christmas Lights- Guessing Quiz

bubble lights

When Christmas is here, so are the Christmas lights. On the tree, on the houses and even on people, Christmas lights have become the cornerstone to any holiday celebration. For over a century, people have embraced them, cursed at them if things go awry, competed with neighbors for the best lighting and lastly (but most importantly), taken pride in their work of making things twinkle and flash.

Many of us don’t know much about the history of Christmas lighting, despite having materials being written about them. We do know that the invention of electrical Christmas lights came right after Thomas Edison invented the light bulb. Afterwards, the rest was history.

I’ve compiled a quiz on the history of Christmas lighting in the US and beyond, with the goal of challenging you all to guess at the answers and learn about how the Christmas lights have evolved into something where we cannot live without them, especially at Christmas time.

So switch on the bubble lights and set to work on these questions. Good luck and the answers will come before the end of the holiday season! 🙂

Christmas Lights QuizChristmas Lights Quiz 2

Hint to Nr. 10: 

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipP3V_c3-O_SG9iuBSodfR1N4SJ8VfNeIYhgLUOoZmWyf-jysZOea4G7OZa5F-ZDuw?key=ZnoxNUZybFN2UmNpeFlqOWZVdEp0V0g1ZFpFaXB3

 

xmas light

FlFi Christmas 2018

Bundesliga Guessing Quiz: The Answers

Stadium woes

After a season of records in 2017/18 and the decisions have been made for the teams winning the relegation playoffs (a heartfelt congrats to the teams that won successfully), let’s have a look at the answers to the quiz dealing with the history of the Bundesliga. As we know, Hamburg was the last founding team to relegate into the second league. But what about the history of the other teams. After doing your homework, let’s check our answers, shall we? 🙂

Guessing Quiz:

1. Who were the founding fathers of the Bundesliga in 1963? There were 18 of them.

Eintracht BraunschweigWerder BremenHamburger SVBorussia Dortmund1. FC KölnMeidericher SV (now MSV Duisburg), Preußen MünsterSchalke 041. FC Kaiserslautern1. FC SaarbrückenEintracht FrankfurtKarlsruher SC1. FC Nürnberg1860 MunichVfB StuttgartHertha BSC

 

2. Bayern Munich entered the top league later on and has been in the Bundesliga ever since. It now holds the title for being in the top league the longest without ever being demoted.

When did the team enter?  1965   When did the team win its first title?  1969

 

 

3. Another team entered the Bundesliga and has yet to also play in the second league after being demoted. It holds the second longest record of its kind. Which team was it and when did it enter the first league for the first time ever?

Bayer Leverkusen entered the Bundesliga in 1979 and has been there ever since. 

 

4. One of the founding fathers actually had to play in the second league only once. After four years it returned to the top league and has been there ever since. It currently holds the title as the second longest tenured team even after it had been demoted before. Which team was that and how many years has it been in the league since its last demotion?

Borussia Dortmund entered the second league in 1972 and  had played there before reentering the top league in 1976, where it has remained there ever since. 

 

5. Prior to HSV’s demotion to the second league, there were two other founding teams that had been in the top league for at least three decades before being demoted for the first time. Which teams were they and when did they get demoted for the first time?

FC Cologne and FC Kaiserslautern

 

6. Which (current) founding team in the Bundesliga has never won any titles since the league’s creation?

Hertha BSC Berlin

 

7. Which two founding members of the Bundesliga has been in the top league the shortest time (and has still yet to return)?

Preussen Münster and FC Saarbrücken

 

8. Which German cities used to host two Bundesliga teams, one of which was a founding member of the team? Which teams are they?

Munich, Hamburg and Stuttgart

 

9. Which German cities used to have two professional teams in the second league competing with each other before one of the two was promoted to the top league?

Berlin and Frankfurt

 

10. Which team would have competed with HSV as the longest tenured Bundesliga team had it not been for the one-year exile in the second league? Hint: This team has been in the second and third tiers since 2006.

FC Kaiserslautern

 

11. Which seven teams have won doubles at least once (meaning the national cup and the Bundesliga title)? Hint: Four were from the former western half and three from the eastern half of Germany.

On the western side, we have Bayern Munich, FC Cologne, Werder Bremen and Borussia Dortmund.

On the eastern side we had Dynamo Dresden, Dynamo Berlin and Hansa Rostock

 

12. Of the three in the former East German Bundesliga (which dissolved after German reunification in 1990), which of them was the longest tenured team in the Bundesliga?

Hansa Rostock: 1995- 2005

13. Of the three above-mentioned teams, which ones defeated FC Bayern Munich once before 1990 and at least once since then?

Dynamo Dresden

Fast fact: Rostock and Bayern Munich were rivalries before Rostock’s demise beginning in 2005

 

14. Since when has FC Bayern Munich finished no worse than third place? Fifth place?

Bayern Munich has finished no worse than 3rd since 2007 and no worse than 5th since 1995, when they finished 6th. The worst they have finished was 12th in 1978. 

15. The following teams had mascots. What were they?

Eintract Brunswick           Lions

MSV Duisburg                   Zebras

FC Kaiserslautern             Devils

Hertha BSC Berlin            The Iron Ladies

Eintracht Frankfurt          Eagles

Hamburg SV                      Dinosaurs

FC Cologne                        Billy Goats

 

Bonus: Holstein Kiel, whose mascot is the flying stork  has not been in the Bundesliga since 1981.

 

ONE MORE THING: 1899 Hoffenheim still holds the title as the only “small town” team that is in the Bundesliga. The community of only 4,000 people marched through the ranks and entered the league in 2007 and has been there since.  They play at a stadium near Mannheim. 

 

FF new logo1

 

(New) Ulm: The Guessing Quiz

U22

After a long hiatus, the Files is taking you back to Minnesota and the German-named villages. Just like with the villages of Bergen and New Trier, the next stop will look at the largest of the 12 villages in Minnesota that carries a name that is common in Germany, comparing the US town with the one straddling the Danube River at the borders between Baden Wurrtemberg and Bavaria.

New Ulm was one of the first villages established after the Treaty of Traverse des Sioux was signed in 1851, which allowed the settlers to claim lands in the southern half of the state of Minnesota. The town was established in 1854, four years before the state entered the Union.  The German equivalent, Ulm, dates back to the time of the Germanic tribes of the 11th Century. Yet thanks to the Napoleon Conquest combined with the rise of King Ludwig II, the city was subsequentially split along river lines in 1810. On the BW side, there is Ulm, on the Bavarian side, Neu-Ulm. Yet both the German communities and the one in Minnesota have parallel lives.

Before looking at the two communities further, here’s a Guessing Quiz for you to try out. One of which features a Mystery Building question. Without further ado, here are a few questions for you to try, with the answers to be given once the article is published:

Mark which cities has what for a place of interest, either with NU-G (Ulm/Neu Ulm, Germany), NU-US (New Ulm, US) or both.

  1. Cathedral

  2. Fort

  3. University

  4. Railway Station

  5. German-Bohemian Monument

  6. Hermann the German Monument

  7. Professional soccer team

  8. Brewery

  9. American-style street patterns

  10. Streets named after American celebrities

  11. Oktoberfest

  12. Christmas market

  13. Fachwerkhäuser (as seen in the picture)

  14. Canals that merge with a major river.

U12t

MYSTERY BUILDING:  This building, features a water tower with a red-white checkerboard pattern located next to a shed. While the building is being used for residential purposes, the water tower is out uf use at the present time. The question is when this water tower was built and what was its original purpose? One clue to help: This is located near the Institute of Technology of Neu Ulm, in an area where the US Army was once stationed until 1991. What else do we know about this?

IMGP9048

GUESSING QUIZ:  This tower is located at the north end of New Ulm’s business district. What is its purpose? What is the name of the tower and who built it?

IMGP9042

Both cities had their share of conflicts and celebrities. Can you name at least one conflict that each town faced? Can you identify two people from each town that became celebrities and in what way?

Good luck with the guessing attempts. The answers will follow. 🙂

FF new logo1

Note: The bridges from both towns will appear in separate articles in the sister column, The Bridgehunter’s Chronicles. Each place has its share of history with these crossings.

Guessing Quiz: Industrial History and Infrastructure

Rendsburg High Bridge in Rendsburg, Germany. Spanning the Baltic-North Sea Canal. Photo taken in April 2011

This is a joint article with the Bridgehunter’s Chronicles in connection with the article on Pocket Guide to Industrial History and Infrastructure between 1871 and 1914. For more information on this teaching experience, please click here for details. The Guessing Quiz is in connection with the article.

 

To close off the topic on Industrialization and Infrastructure in Germany and the USA, I decided to provide you with the Files’ Fact-Finder Guessing Quiz Questions for you to research and find answers. The answers will come after May Day in the Files.

 

1.  In the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, structures made of iron melted like lava, which contributed to the destruction of hundreds of buildings made of iron and wood.  True or False?

2. The Chicago School of Architecture was developed shortly after the Great Fire featuring which architects? Name three and how they contributed to architecture.

3. Who created the first automobile in the world: Ransom Olds, Carl Benz or Henry Ford?

4. The Diesel Motor was created in ______ and is named after this German inventor?

5. List the following canals that were built between 1871 and 1915 in chronological order.

Panama Canal      Dortmund-Ems Canal    Danube Canal    Erie Canal   Elbe-Lübeck Canal   Baltic-North Sea Canal                            Berlin-Havelland Canal

 

6. Prairie Homes consisted of 1-2 story homes made of geometric shapes resembling circles and triangles.  True or False? Who invented the Prairie Homes (Hint: he was part of the Chicago School of Architecture).

 

7. Thomas Edison invented the light bulb in 1878, yet Berlin received its first set of electrical lighting in this year?

 

8.  Which of the following bridge engineers did NOT immigrate to the US?

Seth Hewett, Lawrence Johnson, Gustav Lindenthal, John Roebling, Friedrich Voss, Wendel Bollmann

 

9. The Minneapolis School of Bridge Builders emerged in the 1890s and later became a counterpart to the American Bridge Company conglomerate after the consolidation of _____ bridge builders in 1901. This School featured which family of bridge builders?

Hewett, Johnson, Bayne, Jones

Hewett, Fink, King, Bayne

Voss, King, Jones, Humboldt

Hewett, Maillard, Lindenthal, Steinmann

 

10. The Rendsburg High Bridge was the first bridge in the world that used the loop trestly approach. True or False? If false, when and where was the first loop trestle approach used? (See video here)

 

Happy Guessing! 🙂

 

 

In School in Germany: Experimenting with Flowers

There is a saying worth mentioning as the starting point to this article: Every form of Flora has its multiple uses for the better of human kind.  George Washington Carver found over 110 uses of the peanut during his lifetime.  Before his time, native Americans had found multiple uses with corn and sweet potatoes, many of which we still use today. But what about other plants, in particular, flowers and even herbs?

The dandelion is one of those plants that many people do not like having on their lawns. When they see a yellow blanket of these pesky weeds on their lawns, they are compelled to take the lawn mower and cut them down to size to make it look pretty.  Little do they realize is that these yellow things are much more valuable than they can possibly imagine.  Dandelions are edible- can be used in a salad, or eaten as is. It’s especially good for bunnies as they eat both the leaves as well as the yellow head.  They are the source of pollen and food for bees as they produce honey for the rest of the population. They are an excellent remedy against colds, if used for tea or medicine. Make-up with these flowers has been used. And when converted into the puffball version, one can collect the pollen, replant it in a pot and watch it grow on the window sill.

There are many more uses of these unbeatable weeds in the eyes of perfectionist home owners and invincible flowers in the eyes of naturalists, like yours truly. A good portion of these can be found in a recent version of the children’s TV show Löwenzahn with Fritz Fuchs (played by Guido Hammerstein) and his companion, Keks (a St. Bernard). This includes the Caucasian Dandelion, the largest of the breed of flowers that can be found in central and eastern Europe. Have a look at the link below. 🙂

Link to the Löwenzahn episode about “The Unbeatable Dandelions” (In German)

Watching this episode gave me an idea to pass along to teachers, students and those wanting to try this experiment. If there are so many uses of the dandelion, what about other flowers and plants, like the orchids, daisies, daffodils or even the thistle? After all, these plants may be the ticket to saving many lives if the inventions used are beneficial to others. If Carver can find over 100 uses for the peanut, why can we not find many uses with other plants that we don’t know about?  As mentioned at the beginning, every form of Flora has its multiple uses for the better of human kind.

Try the experiment during your next break. Pick a flower, plant, weed or any type of flora and try making some uses out of them. You will be amazed at the results when trying one experiment after another. If you find any uses, or know of any plants that have as many uses as the dandelion, post your comments here or on the Files’ facebook page. Recipes are also welcome. 😉

By the way, the author will be trying the experiment with the dandelion as an indoor plant again and will post some pictures in the near future, should the plant bear fruit. 🙂

 

2013 Christmas Market Pop Quiz II: The Answers

After having a look at the pictures of the statues of the fairy tale figures, taken at the Gera Christmas market, here are the answers to the Pop Quiz. We would like to know where these fairy tales come from. Click on the answers for more details:

Cinderella

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

The Frog Prince

Puss in Boots

Hansel and Gretel

The Valiant Little Tailor

Rapunzel

Bremen Town Musicians

Mother Goose

We hope you had a chance to try out the quiz and not to worry if one of the answers is incorrect. Sometimes a little refresher helps us, while this is mainly for the kids who would like to know more about them. 🙂

The Flensburg Files will continue its coverage on Berlin’s Christmas markets during the holiday season, with plans of providing you with the last market stop and the quiz on the number of Christmas markets in Germany’s capital in January. In the meantime, the Files and its sister column, The Bridgehunter’s Chronicles, would like to wish everyone all the best this holiday season. Merry Christmas and a Happy 2014 from our house to yours.

Black Friday- The Start of Christmas Shopping

Thanksgiving in America: A day of giving thanks. A day of spending time with family and friends. A day of feasting on turkey, stuffing and the like and watching football. A day to go shopping.

SHOPPING?!!  

Not quite. Thanksgiving is the the day before the start of the Christmas Shopping season, the day that is called Black Friday, because that is where many retailers provide the best deals for people to go shopping, so much that many of them would line up in front of the stores for hours until the doors open and people get what they are looking for.  But aside the fact that we finished celebrating our 150th Thanksgiving (President Abraham Lincoln declared the day a national holiday in lieu of the Gettysburg Address in 1863) plus the fact that the holiday is being shared with the Jewish holiday Haunakah this year, a first in at least two generations, this year’s Thanksgiving will go down in history as the holiday where people stood up to the retailers and said “No!” to shopping on that day.

While there had been a trend going in the last couple of years, where stores open in the evening of Thanksgiving, many of them, most notably Target and Wal-mart, plus some malls in America tried to open during the afternoon of this sacred holiday, at the dismay of many who just want to celebrate with friends and family. This trend goes away from the tradition I was used to, when growing up: where Black Friday started at 9:00am, in some cases (albeit a bit extreme), 6:00am.

Many people in other countries could not believe it. Some are of the assumption that it is typically American to consume around the clock. If that was the case, this whole world would be covered in plastic, and we would become the scapegoat. But deep down, the majority of Americans have stood up to the corporates, saying no to working or even shopping on Thanksgiving. Many of them look at us expats as examples and are envious. In Germany, despite having one Sunday open for shopping per month, all stores are closed on Sundays AND holidays, both religious as well as national. We close on the day of German Reunification (3 October), Pentecost weekend, Good Friday through Easter Monday, Epiphany and even on religious holidays in places like Bavaria, Saarland and Saxony Anhalt. This is just to name a good few. And there is a reason: we tend to use these days as the day of rest, going by the book in accordance to Genesis.  These are the days where streets like this one above are empty. It is unlikely that stores would be open on these days and the streets would be filled to the brim, because many of us want to spend time with family and friends, grilling food and feasting on what is typical for these holidays.

And that is why, despite attempts of the German government to provide exceptions to the rule, that we intend to keep our holidays and put the stores in check, forcing them to respect the wishes of the customers. This has resulted in Americans embracing the European culture in that aspect, for despite having 11 holidays where there is no work and the stores are closed (at least many), they really don’t have much time to spend except at the computer desk or on the road.  If we end up flocking into stores like the one below, only the corporates will be happy because of the profits, but not the Americans.

 

And this takes us back to Thanksgiving and Black Friday, with a bit request to the corporates. Despite your attempts to keep your business running and increase profits, you are actually losing your customers in the long run, because you do not listen to them. Perhaps you should take a look at the holidays and their true meaning. Look at what other countries are doing and how they have profited from them. Adapt to the needs of the customer. Sometimes just returning to the old tradition of having Black Friday beginning at 9:00am helps a great deal, instead of having stores open on Thanksgiving or any day.  Holidays are meant to be the Day of Rest. The Day of Celebration. The Day for Family and Friends. So before the next holiday comes along, why don’t you think about that and make the changes that satisfy everyone?

For those who want to know more about Thanksgiving, a link is provided here.

Dovecote?

Photo taken in December 2012

The Answer to the Flensburg Files’ Frage for the Forum:

To wrap up the 2012 Tour of the Christmas Markets in Germany, and in particular Saxony-Anhalt, let’s go back to the question I had left for the people to consider while touring the Adventsmarkt in Quedlinburg, located in the western part of the state.  Take a look at this picture again, and at the tower. Do you have an idea what that is and what it was used for?

Before going to the answer, some information on its location. As mentioned in the article, the courtyard (hof) at the entrance to Word Garden, where the largest of the 24 market booths were located has a unique history in itself. The Adelshof at Wordgasse 4 features four wings with the entrance at Wordgasse, which connects the northwestern edge of the historic city center and the entrance to Word Garden (after crossing the creek). The south wing is at the old wall surrounding the city center and features a tower. On the west wing is the main residential building, where most of the inhabitants used to live. The barn is located in the north wing and the Word creek passes the East wing. Inside the courtyard one will find this particular piece of artwork, which we’ll get to in a tiny bit. The whole complex is surrounded by a wall, one side of which is part of the main wall that surrounds the city center (or old town), with Fachwerk houses sticking out on the south and east side, ensuring that the tourists will not miss this place.

Adelshof was first mentioned in 1224, as it was the built at that time. It used to be occupied by the Lords of Regenstein in the late 1200s; at that time, it was expanded to include two more building complexes. Yet three different families with royal blood occupied the complex over the next three centuries, beginning with the family of Hans von Wulffen in 1566. Hans received the property as a gift for his victory over the enemies at Sievershausen in 1553. He married Magdalena Pllotho and moved into the complex, where he rebuilt the main residence and constructed the South Wing. Upon his death in 1585, Magdalena took over the property and eventually passed it down to her daughter Elisabeth von Wulffen. During that time, the West Wing was constructed. When the von Hoym family took over in 1620, the East Wing was built. The family occupied the complex for 55 years. After many changes in ownership over the next century, the Koch family took over beginning with Jeremias Timotheus (1760-1815), Johann Andreas (1815-1820) and H. Andreas (1820-1852); during that time, the complex became part of the church.  The complex was taken over after being left idle for 20 years in 2008 and the restoration of the complex started right away. Apart from hosting many public events in the courtyard, a museum, restaurant and Medieval gardens are in the planning in addition to reconstructing many parts of the building. Already the Adelshof has been hosting the Adventsmarkt in December for a few years as one of the 24 booths that should be visited while in Quedlinburg.

And as for the tower in the center of the courtyard (as seen in the photo)? Interestingly enough, that is a dovecote. A dovecote is French for birdhouse, only it houses doves and pigeons. This dovecote was constructed in the 1800s featuring a hexagonal-sided birdhouse made of timber, a Victorian-shaped finial on top, and supported by a column-shaped pedastel made of sandstone. This dovecote was one of the first relicts to have been restored to its original form, in addition to the south and east wings upon visiting the Adelshof this past holiday season, and is one of the main features for this courtyard, in addition to the rest of the complex, parts of which are either being restored even as this article is posted or will be on the list of things to restore in the future.

As mentioned in the article, Quedlinburg is a town full of surprises that will satisfy anyone passing through. Its Christmas market is one of the most local and well-known in Germany. Its Medieval architecture, mostly in tact thanks to the town being spared the bombing in World War II, is one of the oldest in Europe and one that should not be forgotten. And despite the decline in population due to demographic changes and lack of economic opportunity, Quedlinburg, like Halle, Magdeburg and other smaller cities, is one of many reasons why Saxony-Anhalt survives in its original form today and is a magnet for tourism, commerce and business alike. If one visits Saxony-Anhalt sometime, please consider this town as a place to visit, even if it is for a day.

The owners of the Adelshof complex need your help so that the restoration of this Medieval complex is completed and open to the public year round. To find out more about how you can donate money and time to realizing the project, click onto this link. The contact details can be found here.

More about Quedlinburg’s Adventsmarkt can be found here.

 

Lazarus the Bee

Say hello to Lazarus

The last weekend in May has always been touted as the celebration of life. In the USA, we honor our fallen war veterans through Memorial Day and reflect on how the soldiers gave their lives for their country, regardless of when and where they fought. While we do not have such a celebration in Germany, we do take some time off from our work and celebrate Pentecost, a religious holiday commemorating the rise of Jesus Christ and his journey to heaven and where we reflect on how He has influenced our lives through faith and love. Like Memorial Day, we have Mondays free, as well as some Tuesdays for companies that allow it.
This Pentecost weekend was a rather special one for me and my family, as we enjoyed a picnic in the breezy spring sun and took advantage of what nature brought us and spent it in the wilderness. After all, the forest was only a few minutes away from our home by foot going up the hill in the Thuringian Forest. It was also a special moment for one particular bee, who had a moment of resurrection, right before my eyes.
While we were taking photos, I noticed a thick black object on the tip of one of the weeds not far from our picnic spot. Taking a closer look at it, it was a large Bumblebee who was collecting pollen for himself and his colony from this particular weed, only to find that despite the breeze- which would normally shoo him off the weed and away from the field, he stood still, not moving at all. Even when I brought the weed up close to the camera, he appeared lifeless, as if a certain poison from the pollen sucked the tiny bit of life out of him. Even his eyes appeared closed and still creating an impression that he was no longer living.

Coming back to life

After I had stopped taking photos of the “dead” bee, I turned away for a few seconds only to find that when I returned to the spot, the first signs of life came back into the bee. It came back to life as if he reanimated himself and pretended that this stillness, this frozen moment in time had never taken place. After spending a few more minutes collecting the pollen he needed, he left to find some more pollen to collect, but he left an impression worth remembering.
When I think of this event, I remember the readings of the Bible, where Jesus brought Lazarus back to life after he was in still state for four days. For more on that, please refer to the Gospel of John 11:1-46 and 12:9-12. Many thought that Lazarus could not come back to life, until Jesus proved them wrong.  In scientific terms I remember my science teachers talking about how many amphibians would freeze in the winter time, only to reanimate themselves in the spring time to resume their livelihoods.
But the event did present an even truer meaning as far as our lives are concerned. In our society, we manage to go through life as if it was a throw-away society. We try one thing, realize that it is not our cup of tea and therefore, we throw it away for something new. This not only applies to careers- after all it is understandable if we change careers at least three times in our lifetimes. It is universal. We change partners in a short time, we change places and go where the jobs are, and we even change our hobbies- ditching one hobby we had for many years for something new. We sometimes do too many things all at once. Yet little do we realize is that we never really have a chance to get to know ourselves and find out what we are really good at. And when we find out some of the strong points we are really good at, we do not exploit it properly. Instead of being the best in what we do, we strive for money, power and recognition. We ignore who we are and become machines destined for disaster. When we fail in what we do, we give up, instead of trying again. When we make mistakes, we keep moving instead of reflecting on the mistakes and finding ways to avoid them. And in the end, when things really go downhill, we leave everything for dead instead of resuscitating them, starting over and climbing back to the top again. Many of us have become the nomads of the 21st Century.

Busying himself with what he does best- living his life the way he sees it.

We all have our flaws and memories worth forgetting. But we also know that we are here for a reason, which is to provide others with our own natural talents and make them happy. There are some experiments we try and fail and let go. It is all part of life. But the most important is to try and determine which aspects of life really belong to us and that we should develop, and which ones are worth leaving behind. It is very difficult to achieve this but when it is done, we will not be considered by others as “dead to society-“ a pile of scrap heap that can be disposed of and incinerated. Instead we will be considered by others as useful because we know who we are, where we belong to, and who we should spend our lives with.
And even if things are very bleak and that our lives are considered nothing- we have been through all that at least a couple times in our lives- if we learn about ourselves and love ourselves for who we are, we too can come back to life to make a difference. It is never too late to change but only based on our natural instincts and not that of others. Our bee, whom I named Lazarus, reminded me of this as he “came to the living” after a long rest on a sunny day in the fields, making our Pentecost one to remember. I hope that others can learn from this experience too and find out more about themselves.