The Creative Creator Creatively Creates a Creation- A Look at Derivations in English

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Derivations is the process of converting one grammatical aspect into another, by changing the suffix of the word given. As a general rule, we start with the root word, mainly a verb or a noun. By adding an ending, you change the grammatical function of the word. To a certain extent, the meaning of the word is altered as well.

Looking at the title of this article, we see that the root word create can be altered at least five times. The root word is the verb. Creator is the personal noun. Creation is the processional noun. Creative is the adjective and by adding an –ly at the end of that word, it’s an adverb.

Derivation 1

 

Our focus is on three of the most important aspects of derivation: verb, noun and adjective form for each conversion has its own set of rules. Have a look at the tables below:

Derivation 3

Derivation 2

Derivation 4

The nouns vary for there are four different forms, including one between personal and processional nouns, as seen in the acitivites per link here.

 

Activity 1: Conversion  There are three different tables. Look at each word in the table and find its grammatical equivalent. An example in each table is given.

 

Adjective Verb
Adaptable

 

Analytical

 

Critical

 

Innovative

 

Inspired

 

Proven

 

Viable

 

Destructive

 

Demonstrative

 

Cooperative

 

Adapt

Communicate

 

Innovate

 

Rely

 

Determine

 

Create

 

Demonstrate

 

Do

 

Sensitize

 

Believe

 

Deny

Verb Noun
Implement

Organize

 

Produce

 

Inquire

 

Develop

 

Plan

 

Justify

 

Orientate

 

Hire

 

Operate

 

Fail

 

Implementation

 

Introduction

 

Attachment

 

Performance

 

Identification

 

Identification

 

Termination

 

Judgement

 

Suspension

 

Proceedure

 

Analysis

 

Noun Adjective
Department

 

Friendliness

 

Necessity

 

Attachment

 

Essence

 

Religion

 

Decision

 

Nativity

 

Congress

 

Presentation

 

Assertion

Departmental

Able

 

Responsible

 

Analytical

 

Beneficial

 

Creative

 

Capable

 

National

 

Presidential

 

Executive

 

Sexual

 

 

Activity 2: Fill-in/ Multiple Choice  Choose the right word to complete each sentence

  1. I cannot trust my colleague. He is (unreliable/ unrely).
  2. Her behavior is too (destruction/ destructive).
  3. The students had a chance to (criticize/ critical) the examiners over their score.
  4. The presenter was very (communicative/communication) to his audience.
  5. The (elimination/ eliminative) of the department will cost the company 30 jobs.
  6. The railroad (state/ station) is on the left side of the street.
  7. An (analysis/ analyse) from the doctor revealed that you have a tumor.
  8. Using hate speech in school is grounds for (dismiss/ dismissal). Note: Grounds for dismissal is the same is being fired/canned/terminated from your job)
  9. The person, who rolled the truck into the garage, said it was (accident/ accidental).
  10. The car is a (valued/valuable) asset to this family.

 

Activity 3: Now for an even bigger challenge- Using the root word in parenthesis, complete the sentence using either the verb, adjective or noun form.  The topic is how to prepare for a test in class.

  1. _______________ is the key when you have a big test coming up. (prepare)
  2. It is important to __________ notes and pay _____________ to the teacher in class. (take/ attend).
  3. Sometimes it helps to have a _______________ outline so that better understand the _____________ of the topic. (structure/ complex)
  4. Sometimes, attending a ______________ will help you with questions that are hard but _________________ to answer (tutor/do)
  5. But you must be _________________ and clear in addressing these ____________ questions. (communicate/complicate)
  6. It is sometimes ____________________and _________________ to start studying two months before the test. (use/ help).
  7. Having ____________ partners in a study group will make studying for a test even more fun. (rely)
  8. Having good study habits, such as good ______________ skills, thorough notes and some nmemonics will help in your _______________ as a person later on. (organize/develop).
  9. The night before the test, it is ______________ not to drink caffeine nor alcohol and to get a ___________ amount of sleep. (advise/ manage).
  10. On the day of the test, be _____________ and think positive. After the test, you can __________! (confide/party).

 

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Genre of the Week: I am a Teacher

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One of many German schools.

Author’s Note: A while back, I ran across this poem through one of my English teaching colleagues who is in the same teaching network as I am. Teaching is a tough profession where one has to have strong nerves and courage to not just order to the classroom, but to teach the students the essentials that will help them in their career path. This poem is for all the teachers out there, regardless of which subjects you are teaching, and regardless which age groups, educational institution and backgrounds. Behind every person is- a teacher

I may be a School Teacher

I may be a College Lecturer

I may be a University Professor!

 

Behind that Doctor,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Engineer,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Statistician,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Nuclear Physicist,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Mathmatician,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Scientist,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Zoologist,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Entomologist,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Botanist,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Economist,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Entrepreneuer,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Lawyer,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behiond that Political Scientist,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Psychologist,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Architect,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Astrologer,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

Behind that Astronomer,

It’s Me, a Teacher.

I don’t qualify for a bungalow, or a villa, nor earn enough to buy an expensive house or a car, like corrupt officers or corrupt politicians,

But yes, I’m a Teacher.

Some think or even say that I have too many holidays. They never know that I spend those holidays either correcting papers or planning what and how I’m going to teach when I go back to the blackboard or whiteboard…….

Because I am a Teacher.

Sometimes I get confused and even get stressed by the ever-changing policies over what and how I have to teach…..

Despite all that, I am a Teacher and I love to teach and I am teaching….

On pay-days, I don’t laugh as corrupt officers and others do. But by the next day, I love to come with a smile to those that I teach…..

Because I am a Teacher;  yes, I am a Teacher

The main source of my satisfaction is when I see them grow. I see them succeed. I see them having all those assets. I see them bravely face the world and its challenges. And I say yes, I have taught in spite of living in a world opened by Google….

Because I am a Teacher…… Yes I am a Teacher

It doesn’t matter how they look at me

It doesn’t matter how much more they earn than I do

It doesn’t matter that they drive while I walk because all they have is through me, A Teacher

Whether they acknowledge me or not, I am a Teacher.

 

This poem is dedicated to all the teachers, lecturers, professors and students (past and present), who have seen teachers toil through the papers, tearing up when grown-ups don’t cry, and take pride in the work in the classroom and on paper. Each of us have a favorite teacher or two. Many teachers still keep in touch with their former students to find out how they are doing. And sometimes torches get passed down because of how the teacher teaches in the classroom and how the students enjoy the class and take something with them as they move on to the next chapter in life. This one is for you. 🙂 ❤ 

 

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Tongue Twisters: The Long E

 

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Prost! Cheers! Salut! Mazeltov! From the two travel companions enjoying a good Flens beer: BamBam and CoCo (brown)

I’d like to start this tongue twister with this anecdote: Four campers- two Americans and two Germans- are in the forest at an open fire when the Germans go to the camper to get some Frankfurters for the fire. Seconds later they come back screaming “BEER!” As big of beer fans as they are, the Americans run to the camper, assuming they are getting a good deal on a bottle of beer. However, as they arrive at the camper, they’re greeted with this:

By the way, that is a BEAR- as in BÄR in German! And by the way, it is scientifically proven that bears drink beer as seen in this video below:

 

As a tip, if a German says BEER in distress, ask them if they mean BEAR!

 

This is one of the most common problems we have with pronunciation of words in English. People see the spelling of English words but pronounce them in their foreign language. This example of the mispronunciation of BEER and BEAR is a classic example of such, both in general as well as in this segment of tongue twisters dealing with the long –E- in English.

 

Long –E- words feature the following word categories, all of which have the common denominator of stretching the mouth horizontally, “Eeeeeeeeeeeee.” :

-EE-: Words with –ee- also at the end, such as:  deed, see, bee, ween, beech, need, steel, seem, queen, street, coffee, squeeze, freeze, committee, fifteen, teenager, etc.  And yes, BEER falls here. The exception is the word “been” because it has the short “-e” pronunciation.

 

-EA: Many words, mostly with the endings of –ch, consonant+ e, -d, -l, -m, -n, -r, -on and –t  fall into this category, such as the following: reach, clean, beam, seam, leave, treat, rear, real, deal, reason and season.

Keep in mind, that words, like READ and  LEAD also have the short –e pronunciation, but different functions. Read is a homophone, whose short –e form is past tense. Lead (long –e) means to direct a group (German: Führen) but the short –e form means a metal found in water and pencils (German: Blei).

 

-IE: Like in the first two categories, one will find quite a few –ie- words whose pronunciation has the long –e-. Examples include: chief, field, ariel, adieu, thief, premier, and hygiene.

Please note that words with  –ie at the end, have the long –i- pronunciation, such as die, lie and pie.

 

-IE_E: Words with –ie plus a consonant + e ending also have the long –e sound. Examples: believe, relieve, perceive, piece, achieve, butadiene, apiece, niece.

-Y: Most words with a consonant plus a y will also have the long –e- sound, such as the following examples:    body, marry, vary, wary, dairy, very, wavy, Navy, family, baby, cherry, thirty, memory, baby.

 

Yet take care that words with the following consonant+ y ending end with a long –i- sound: -l, -n. –p, -p and –r. Examples: cry, try, lying, rely, apply, reply, xylophone.

 

_-E: Yet as a general rule, words with the consonant+ e at the end, unless a vowel predates the ending, always have the long –e for sound. Examples include: Japanese, Chinese, delete, concede, gene, these, geese, complete, interfere, here, severe, theme.

 

To sum up, long –e- words can be found in words that either have –ee-, -ie-, -ea, spellings as well as with an –e at the end, keeping in mind the exceptions.  Any questions?

 

If not: here’s a youtube video with a guide on pronouncing the words in long –e- form. This is done in a form of tongue twisters and like in the previous Tongue Twister articles (click here and scroll to see the rest), you can listen then pause to allow yourself or your class to practice.

 

And yes, we have bears drinking beer in this video! 😉 Enjoy! 🙂

 

Prost! 😀

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Bear drinking beer at a Bavarian restaurant. Source: thedrinksbusiness.com

 

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The Many Forms of Why in German

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Flensburg’s skyline at night- it is just as active as its looks. Photo taken in April, 2011

In English, we have several ways to ask questions, among them the Seven Golden Ws, consisting of Who, What, When, Where, Why, How (and its many forms) and Which. Each one has a different meaning in context.

In German, we have not only the Seven Golden Ws for asking questions: Wer, Was, Wann, Wo, Warum, Wie and Wessen, but each of the golden Ws is subdivided unto several types. For example, we have for Wer, which includes Wen and Wem. The division is based on the personal form- here with the nominative Wer, it’s accusative and dative, respectively.

For the Golden W Warum, there are many types one can use. This German linguist decided to use the comparison of Warum by using the Book of Genesis in a parodiable way.  Believe it or not, these variants are the same but have a slight difference. Can you find these differences? 🙂

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The Creative Use of “UP”

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I came across this rather funny story about the use of UP, a word that has six functions in English: noun, verb, preposition, adjective, adverb and a phrasal verb. Read this one and you will get a good laugh out of it. Source courtesy of Marílla Escramo.

 

This two-letter word in English has more meanings than any other two-letter word. That word is up. It is listed in the dictionary as an adverb, preposition, adjective, noun or verb. It’s easy to understand up, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when awaken in the morning, why do we wake up?

At a meeting, why does a topic come up? Why do we speak up and why are the officers up for election, if there is a tie, it is a toss-up, and why is it up to the secretary to write up a report?

We call up our friends, brighten up a room, polish up the silver, warm up the leftovers and clean up the kitchen. We lock up the house and fix up the old car.

At other times, this little word has a real special meaning. People stir up trouble, line up for tickets, work up an appetite, and think up excuses.

To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed up is special.

And this up can be confusing. A drain must be opened up because it is blocked up!!!

To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of up, look up the word up in the dictionary. In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes up almost ¼ of the page and can add up to about thirty definitions!!!

If you are up to it, you might try building up a list of many ways up is used. It will take up a lot of your time, but if you don’t give up, you may wind up with up to a hundred or more.

When it threatens to rain, we say it’s clouding up. When the sun comes out, we say it is clearing up. When it rains, it soaks up the earth. When it does not rain for awhile, things dry up.

So did this while thing crack you up?

Send this on to everyone you look up in your address book……. Or not…… it’s up to you.  🙂

 

And to end this up, here’s a quote that will up your knowledge: Whenever you are down, the only way to go up in the world is up.  Any questions? 😉 

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Aufhören in English: The many different ways to express it.

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To kick off the weekend, I would like to ask you this question: How do we say aufhören in English?

The first thing that came to mind was a scene in the film Stripes, which starred Bill Murray, Harold Ramis and Warren Oates.  Watch this Scene where the platoon get into a brawl while practicing for graduation (from 2:30 on) and ask yourselves whether what the character Winger says can be translated into the German word or not:

 

Or in this scene before, when Winger had a bad day (example right at the beginning) which got worse when his girlfriend walked out on him:

 

In both cases, they can be translated into German for Aufhören.

Aufhören can be categorized into 3-4 categories, of which two of them are most commonly used: one meaning stop it, the other one meaning to quit. Yet interestingly enough, there are several variants in the two categories that can be used, keeping in mind that not everything is 100% one size fits all. Here is a collection of the English equivalents to the German word Aufhören, which you can use in English, keeping the examples in mind as well as a couple other film examples. Feel free to add more if you think they should.

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Hope they help. 🙂

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Translation: The Longest German Words found in Duden

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If there is something that is typical of German culture and language, it is the fact that the German language has some of the longest words in the world. Longest because they literally are equivalent to words that fill up the entire Latin alphabet and more. Longest because they mostly can be found in the Duden dictionary . Longest because they are difficult to translate. In other words, we don’t have English equivalents similar to them and therefore, we are forced to paraphrase  in English.

Or perhaps not? Perhaps one can find a one-word equivalent despite the fact that finding them are almost impossible.

Take a look at the list of the longest words in German, based in the number of letters. All of them are longer than the Latin alphabet. The question is: what are the equivalents in English, let alone your own native language? Challenge yourselves and provide your answers in the comment section below. Good luck! 😀

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