Translation: The Longest German Words found in Duden

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If there is something that is typical of German culture and language, it is the fact that the German language has some of the longest words in the world. Longest because they literally are equivalent to words that fill up the entire Latin alphabet and more. Longest because they mostly can be found in the Duden dictionary . Longest because they are difficult to translate. In other words, we don’t have English equivalents similar to them and therefore, we are forced to paraphrase  in English.

Or perhaps not? Perhaps one can find a one-word equivalent despite the fact that finding them are almost impossible.

Take a look at the list of the longest words in German, based in the number of letters. All of them are longer than the Latin alphabet. The question is: what are the equivalents in English, let alone your own native language? Challenge yourselves and provide your answers in the comment section below. Good luck! 😀

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100 years of Bauhaus, or the myth of German efficiency

100 years of Bauhaus, or the myth of German efficiency

Germany is celebrating its 100th anniversary of Bauhaus. There are several articles on this topic. This is one of many that you will see later on this year.

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There’s a fascinating podcast series called How to F**k Up An Airport. I challenge you to listen to it and not find yourself questioning everything you’d ever thought about the efficiency and orderliness of Germany. After all, Berlin’s new airport was supposed to replace three existing airports, and be a symbol of national pride and the city’s post-reunification resurgence. It is also the airport where, “instead of a working fire safety system, they planned to hire up to 800 people to act as human fire alarms”.

Listen to this tale of woe and you might understand what has gone wrong in planning the 100-year anniversary celebration of Bauhaus.

Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany

Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany

Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany

Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany

Dessau, Germany Dessau, Germany

Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany

It’s not as if Germany hasn’t had a century to prepare for the centenary of the Bauhaus movement. Yet the opportunity to celebrate perhaps…

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Abwechslungsreiches Programm zwischen Savoir-vivre und Sport Hamburg- Der Landgang beim 830. HAFENGEBURTSTAG HAMBURG lohnt sich ganz besonders. Von Freitag, 10. Mai, bis Sonntag, 12. Mai, präsentiert das größte Hafenfest der Welt ein erlebnisreiches Programm mit Prominenten, südfranzösischem Flair und kultureller Vielfalt. Diese zeigt sich neben der Übertragung von Konzertmitschnitten aus der Elbphilharmonie und den Konzerten […]

via Landgang mit Stars beim 830. Hafengeburtstag Hamburg — Presse.Online | Aktuelle Nachrichten

There is a link to the events in English, which you can find here: https://www.hamburg-travel.com/see-explore/events/hamburg-harbour-birthday/?fbclid=IwAR1LnG-m1awMIJKmC8JWkE3XImj1aFHejOAxeI2f9phQrPFwgLK2hPQmlbk

Why German is a beautiful language

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Picked up this rather interesting set of “word-for-word” translations going from Germany into English with both the literal as well as the actual meanings from one of the German facebook sites. Something to ponder, or even laugh about. Whatever type of humor you have. 😉  Enjoy! 😀

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Easter Genre: The Beggar’s Greatest Wish

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Before saying farewell to Easter, we have a genre piece that is worth a read and something to consider. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the booklet written by Alyce Bergey entitled The Beggar’s Greatest Wish. The book was written with one theme in mind: The greatest wish of one person.

Before going to the plot, ask yourselves this question:

If there was one wish that you had that you wanted badly, what would that be?

 

Everyone has one greatest wish, no matter the circumstances.  Some who are crippled wish to walk again. Others suffering from poverty and other forms of adversity want to be rich. Those who fail constantly want to succeed just one. Yet most of us want peace after suffering from years of conflict, both home and away.

For the main character, Barthimaeus, an old man living in a one-room hut outside Jericho, he wanted to see, for he was blind and was a beggar wanting to find a place in the world, but was rejected by many. Day in and day out, he begged on the street and got next to nothing from the public. Every day he was ignored, spat upon, degraded and taken pity. Yet later in the story, his luck started to change beginning with him receiving a single coin and then culminating to his encounter with Jesus Christ, as He and his followers were walking down the streets of Jericho. He found the beggar and after learning what his wish was, his life changed for the very best.

Based on the story of Luke 18:37-45, the theme of the story was believing in miracles and how they can come true through faith and fate. Faith has to do in the belief that if one works hard and prays for the most important thing in life, it will come true. Fate has to do with encountering the unknown and having that wish granted. It can be through the encounter with the Lord or another person. It also has to do with certain events that puts the events in order of sequence that eventually culminates into one’s wish being granted.  Expected or unexpected, each of us have a special wish based on our trials and tribulations which eventually come true through our own actions and belief. If we didn’t have them, we would allow our world to unfold in front of our eyes that would not be to our best advantage.

When Jesus died for our sins, He left us the belief that miracles can happen if we have the faith and courage to make it happen- if we pray and also do our service. It goes beyond the fishermen story when Jesus came from Heaven to give them fish to feed themselves and their families. It goes beyond Job’s struggles when he lost everything to famine and drought and he got that back. It even goes beyond our own personal wishes in real life- mine has to do with putting an end to global warming and polluting the oceans.  While this book was written for children but has an explanation for parents, the theme is the same. It’s more of a question of what we have for our wish and what we can do to make it come true.

To close off this genre special, here are a pair of videos that was based on this story. I hope you enjoy and have a chance to read the story to your children:

 

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Typical for the region: Easter fountain.

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Taken last year, one will see many of these in German communities- the Osterbrunnen (Easter Fountain). More on its history can be found here.

 

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Happy Easter!

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Happy Easter! ❤ 🙂

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