Genre of the Week: Wir sind die Neuen

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Our next genre of the week looks at generational conflicts and how each one handles societal problems differently. Produced by Ralf Westhoff, Wir sind die Neuen (translated as We are the New Neighbors) features two sets of three people, each coming from two different generations. The Babyboomer generation features Annie, a biologist, Johannes, a lawyer and Eddie, a musician. Each one had their professions rise and fall and all of them are single, although Eddie reveals something far worse during the latter part of the story. Annie was evicted from her apartment and decided to create a dormitory with her two friends from college, Eddie and Johannes,  at their old apartment near campus of the university in Munich, the setting of the story. Despite their return to the days of talking about philosophy and God over a bottle of red wine, they face two conflicts: the change in personality and lifestyles over the years- which the three manage to handle in one way or another- and the centerpiece of conflicts in the story, dealing with three college students, Katharina, Thorsten and Barbara. They come from rich families, are textbook about the rules of the apartment- and thus come into conflict with the three older sixty-something inhabitants- and spend amples of time buried in the internet/laptop. Yet, they cannot grapple with the life that is outside their apartment, which includes dealing with humor, heartbreak and love, and the basics of taking care of themselves and their health. Their obsession is trying to complete their studies in law, yet being buried in books, they feel hopeless and eventually, despite their personality conflicts with Annie, Johannes and Eddie, they drop their differences and accept their offer of help. With the willingness to be open, a lot of things happen to all the characters in the story, bridging the gap between the generation that is in the twilight in their lifetimes and the generation that is blossoming and have a promising a future.

Wir sind die Neuen focuses on several aspects that can be discussed in any situation, even in the classroom. The first is dealing with the differences between the Babyboomer Generation (those born between 1945 and 1965 and were children of the parents who had served in World War II) and the Y Generation (those born from 1985 onwards) as well as the characteristics and culture values that are important to each one. This includes the music they listen to, the topics they pay attention to in the news, and their philosophical standpoint in life. Coming from the “Bridge-Generation,” known as the X-Generation (those born between 1966 and 1984), we seem to be sandwiched between the two different spheres the generations present to us. While we have created our own identities and culture, we seem to have adopted much of this from our parents as well as those who are much younger than we are.  So one aspect we can look at is what is typical of the two generations in the story and provide examples of conflicts that could potentially come between the two generations.

Another aspect worth noting is the lifestyle in Germany between the two generations and the comparison with that of another country, like the US, Britain or any European country. This includes university life, culture,  the way of thinking, etc. Many of these examples were brought up in the film.  And finally, one should have a look at how people change in life. Especially in the Baby Boomer generation, the characters among the group developed differently that there were conflicts among the group. The return to the “good old days” was an attempt to recognize their ownself, reconcile with each other for their differences and lastly, reboot their lives and try something new, or supplement their careers, as was the case with Johannes.

The film’s main theme, especially when you look at the preview is this: No matter the difference, we are all the same in one way or another. If we want to help each other succeed, we need to tear the walls down and build the bridge to bring the two together. If you are unsure how, check out the film. There are many ways of how it can be done.

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