Raddeln unterwegs mit dem Radler

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Sunday afternoon on a bike trail going through the Black Forest. You and a group of campers carrying backpacks are on the trail with their bikes, each one with an Alsterwasser (EN: lemon sherry)  in his hand, all are quatsching about black bears purging their campgrounds with one of them carrying away a Coleman cooler full of beer with the handle in his mouth, another making his home in a kiddie pool cooling off, and another one chasing the campers on their bikes out of the forest- and through the windows of a liquour store- all underage and their bikes banged up in the end! All of the sudden, as one of the campers was talking about how the bear threw his bike over the fence and onto the property owned by a steel thief (who snatches the bike and tries selling the parts for the price of scrap metal),  you ask him if he is insured. The answer is no, but the response comes as follows: “You better because we have a beer on the trail!”   Looking ahead, anticipating that it was a case of the best Lammsbräu Radler, they see a great big black bear in the middle of the trail! And he is indeed guarding the Lammsbräu, wanting to try it because of its sweetness.

01_schwarzbc3a4r

By Diginatur (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

 

As an annoyed native speaker of English, on the run for your life as the bear chases you and the campers, your response: “That is not a beer, you idiot! That was a BEAR!!! Bear as in Bae- AAA- ERRRR!”

 

As a baffled camper, he responds with (______________).

 

While the campers are on the run with a bear on their tails, their only true insurance is the fact that they are on their bikes and can cycle as fast as they can. Otherwise they would have to climb up a tree. But while the bear story reminds the non-native speaker of English (esp. the German-speaking people) that there is a difference between bear and beer, both phonetically speaking as well as semantic-wise, our topic for this article is cycling in Germany and ways to keep your bike safe from even the craziest of thieves.

13055708_1138519432845371_8889841369156087473_o

As I wrote last year in the Files, the bicycle is the second most common form of transportation in Germany behind public transport. Over 72 million residents in Germany own a bike, whereas 40.2% of bikers use this precious form of transportation on a daily basis. 49.5% of users take the bike at least once a week.  Like the Danes who bike in Copenhagen and other cities, the bike is, to the Germans, also like a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Bread is just not good enough with butter. Peanut butter is OK if you want to offer the conductor of the Deutsche Bahn that as a peace-offering for not having a train ticket in your possession (because the ticket machine at the station you left is kaputt). But with jelly, it’s sweet. Biking is almost free, you are independent and can get from point A to point B. You can see the rarest places on the narrow streets of Flensburg, bike along the Baltic-North Sea Canal from coast to coast and see ships and bridges galore. You can take your family camping just by crossing the Fehmarn Bridge from Bad Oldesloe and Oldenburg and camp at one of the island’s several campgrounds, while biking from the bridge to the ferry at Puttgarden in a matter of a half hour. In other words, biking is healthy, easy and fun.

 

Yet speaking from experience, when something happens to your bike, whether it is theft or vandalism, it takes away the fun from the form of transport, like a person switching your peanut butter and jelly sandwich with one with just butter or peanut butter. It’s simply not good.  A while back, I had a chance to ask some bike experts and other bike enthusiasts about how they can keep their bikes safe, I had a few answers that will surprise you. Here are some facts that will help you keep your bike safe and in use for many years to come.

used bike
Typical of a used bike. This one I had while living in Bayreuth in 2009.

 

Buy a used bike while in a city- This fact is the norm if living in a big city, like Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt or even the Ruhr Area. Bike thefts are more common as the population increases. Therefore it is unwise to present yourself with a brand new Stevens bike when commuting to work in a big city unless you have extra protection. Used bikes are inexpensive and if you know how to repair it properly, it can last a long time.

 

Learn to fix your bike yourself- While there are some parts, such as a tire rim, gear system or even the lighting system where you need professional experts to fix, sometimes incremental fixes, such as replacing a tire, oiling the chains, replacing the headlight and odometer can save a trip to the bike shop. If you are a novice, a repair book or even some advice from a friend who fixes bikes can help.

bikes in winter

Tune your bike regularily- If you bike long distances- be it commuting or going on bike tours- it is important to have your bike inspected to ensure that any problems detected can be solved right away. Pending on how often you bike, inspections are best done 3-4 times a year, especially if you bike in the winter time. Trust me, people bike in the snow to work in the winter time. I’ve done this myself.

 

Insure your bike- Germany is not like Switzerland when it comes to insurance. While that country obliges you to have the Vignette, Germany may end up using the Swiss example in the near future, for even though insurance is not obligatory unless you have Haftpflicht to protect your bike from theft at home, it is wise to have it just in case. This includes the ARAG and DEVK, which has a complete coverage of bike insurance, covering you from theft and accidents. Other insurances have this as part of their main insurance plan. You should check this out when you have a bike and are often on the trail with it.

 

Keep your proof of evidence- For reasons stated in the next tip, when buying your bike, make sure you keep your proof of purchase and all information pertaining to it. In case anything happens to the bike, you may need it. Sometimes the bike store where you purchased it may have that information in their databank in case you don’t have it on hand.

Code your bike- Steel and rubber are becoming the commodity that thieves and desperados are taking advantage of, both shamelessly as well as professionally. That’s why the police encourage  you to code your bike so that the information is registered in the files and in case your bike gets stolen, they can track it down in a hurry.  They are effective, and a person can get his/her bike back without having to worry about buying a new one, as seen in the clip. The only caveat to this is by the time the bike is found, all that is left is the frame as the rest are taken for the purpose of (….). If a person is desperate to steal a rubber handle of a bike horn, he/she is willing to do everything. But being safe than sorry, coding means security against such theft. The police and other authorities have coding sessions on a regular basis, so ask if you are interested.

13064728_1154660557897925_5273349102716688573_o

Know your bike- Most victims of bike theft don’t know their bike is stolen until it’s too late. One second the bike is in the bike stand, the next second it is stolen. If this happens and you report it to the police right away (which you should), make sure you know your bike and its description to the finest detail. This includes providing a photo of your bike, however, it also includes what your bike has for features, such as the brand, color, features but also other items, such as dirt, scratches, stickers, etc. A few months back, my bike was stolen, forcing me to report it to the police. I was amazed at the number of features I could remember on my bike, as seen in the picture above- can you identify some unusual features my bike has? …..

31708_122931727737485_1779162_n

Know your neighbors and contact them- Your neighbors are a primary commodity, especially when they see you cycling and know what bike you have. Therefore, in case something happens to your bike, inform them right away. They will keep their eyes out and ensure that your bike is safe and sound. Most of the time, they are willing to cooperate with the police and other authorities should the theft be reported and that be a necessity.  I was fortunate that one of my neighbors in the apartment block, who had been informed of someone stealing the bike, found it a few blocks away while I was reporting the incident. However not all stories have happy endings. Therefore, take good care of your bike and….

 

Lock your bike if not in use- It takes a second for your bike to disappear. It is stupid to have your bike stolen- stupider when you don’t lock it beforehand. Two seconds with a key saves a whole day at the police station reporting it, period.

13113026_1149255401771774_1476528011566377764_o

Flensburg Points apply to the bike- Like the car, the bike is a vehicle and therefore, the rules of the road apply to the cyclists, even if they are on the bike-autobahn and other bike trails. Obey and you won’t have to pay for a Flensburg point.

Use your head, wear a helmet!- While some people believe helmets can be harmful than helpful, here’s one story a professor mentioned to his students at the beginning of a lecture, a while back: On his way to his lecture, he was involved in an accident with a car. He suffered a concussion after the impact but survived thanks to the helmet he wore. Can you imagine what would have happened had he NOT worn a helmet? If you are a fool, try it. But if your life as well as your family and friends matter, then maybe you should think and wear it! 80 Euros for a helmet is better than 80,000 Euros for funeral costs.

Biking can be a lot of fun for yourself as well as the family. Already it is the second main form of transportation behind public transportation, regardless of purpose. It is just a matter of following a few points regarding taking care of the bike, and the vehicle can be your friend for life. Bikes deserve to be treated just like a horse. They can get you from point A to point B, but they deserve the treatment as any pet- or car. If the bike fails and you are tired of it, give it to someone else, or do like I did to a used one: tie it to a light post and allow someone to take it for his own. It was a custom I invented when leaving a university for another job offer elsewhere in Germany- not just as a way of leaving a mark for what I did there, but for someone willing to take my used bike for his/her purpose, while purchased my current bike, a black Diamant with the name of Galloping Gertie, which has not failed me since then. Sometimes, a good brand name plus good maintenance goes a long way, especially after the thousands of kilometers she has accumulated in such a short time. You can do the same too. 🙂

 

flefi-deutschland-logo

 

 

Raddeln Unterwegs Mit Dem Radler

13723896_1193260514037929_8529569360638148254_o

Sunday afternoon on a bike trail going through the Black Forest. You and a group of campers carrying backpacks are on the trail with their bikes, each one with an Alsterwasser (EN: lemon sherry)  in his hand, all are quatsching about black bears purging their campgrounds with one of them carrying away a Coleman cooler full of beer with the handle in his mouth, another making his home in a kiddie pool cooling off, and another one chasing the campers on their bikes out of the forest- and through the windows of a liquour store- all underage and their bikes banged up in the end! All of the sudden, as one of the campers was talking about how the bear threw his bike over the fence and onto the property owned by a steel thief (who snatches the bike and tries selling the parts for the price of scrap metal),  you ask him if he is insured. The answer is no, but the response comes as follows: “You better because we have a beer on the trail!”   Looking ahead, anticipating that it was a case of the best Lammsbräu Radler, they see a great big black bear in the middle of the trail! And he is indeed guarding the Lammsbräu, wanting to try it because of its sweetness.

01_schwarzbc3a4r

By Diginatur (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

As an annoyed native speaker of English, on the run for your life as the bear chases you and the campers, your response: “That is not a beer, you idiot! That was a BEAR!!! Bear as in Bae- AAA- ERRRR!”

As a baffled camper, he responds with (______________).

While the campers are on the run with a bear on their tails, their only true insurance is the fact that they are on their bikes and can cycle as fast as they can. Otherwise they would have to climb up a tree. But while the bear story reminds the non-native speaker of English (esp. the German-speaking people) that there is a difference between bear and beer, both phonetically speaking as well as semantic-wise, our topic for this article is cycling in Germany and ways to keep your bike safe from even the craziest of thieves.

13055708_1138519432845371_8889841369156087473_o

As I wrote last year in the Files, the bicycle is the second most common form of transportation in Germany behind public transport. Over 72 million residents in Germany own a bike, whereas 40.2% of bikers use this precious form of transportation on a daily basis. 49.5% of users take the bike at least once a week.  Like the Danes who bike in Copenhagen and other cities, the bike is, to the Germans, also like a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Bread is just not good enough with butter. Peanut butter is OK if you want to offer the conductor of the Deutsche Bahn that as a peace-offering for not having a train ticket in your possession (because the ticket machine at the station you left is kaputt). But with jelly, it’s sweet. Biking is almost free, you are independent and can get from point A to point B. You can see the rarest places on the narrow streets of Flensburg, bike along the Baltic-North Sea Canal from coast to coast and see ships and bridges galore. You can take your family camping just by crossing the Fehmarn Bridge from Bad Oldesloe and Oldenburg and camp at one of the island’s several campgrounds, while biking from the bridge to the ferry at Puttgarden in a matter of a half hour. In other words, biking is healthy, easy and fun.

Yet speaking from experience, when something happens to your bike, whether it is theft or vandalism, it takes away the fun from the form of transport, like a person switching your peanut butter and jelly sandwich with one with just butter or peanut butter. It’s simply not good.  A while back, I had a chance to ask some bike experts and other bike enthusiasts about how they can keep their bikes safe, I had a few answers that will surprise you. Here are some facts that will help you keep your bike safe and in use for many years to come.

used bike
Typical of a used bike. This one I had while living in Bayreuth in 2009.

Buy a used bike while in a city- This fact is the norm if living in a big city, like Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt or even the Ruhr Area. Bike thefts are more common as the population increases. Therefore it is unwise to present yourself with a brand new Stevens bike when commuting to work in a big city unless you have extra protection. Used bikes are inexpensive and if you know how to repair it properly, it can last a long time.

Learn to fix your bike yourself- While there are some parts, such as a tire rim, gear system or even the lighting system where you need professional experts to fix, sometimes incremental fixes, such as replacing a tire, oiling the chains, replacing the headlight and odometer can save a trip to the bike shop. If you are a novice, a repair book or even some advice from a friend who fixes bikes can help.

bikes in winter

Tune your bike regularily- If you bike long distances- be it commuting or going on bike tours- it is important to have your bike inspected to ensure that any problems detected can be solved right away. Pending on how often you bike, inspections are best done 3-4 times a year, especially if you bike in the winter time. Trust me, people bike in the snow to work in the winter time. I’ve done this myself.

Insure your bike- Germany is not like Switzerland when it comes to insurance. While that country obliges you to have the Vignette, Germany may end up using the Swiss example in the near future, for even though insurance is not obligatory unless you have Haftpflicht to protect your bike from theft at home, it is wise to have it just in case. This includes the ARAG and DEVK, which has a complete coverage of bike insurance, covering you from theft and accidents. Other insurances have this as part of their main insurance plan. You should check this out when you have a bike and are often on the trail with it.

Keep your proof of evidence- For reasons stated in the next tip, when buying your bike, make sure you keep your proof of purchase and all information pertaining to it. In case anything happens to the bike, you may need it. Sometimes the bike store where you purchased it may have that information in their databank in case you don’t have it on hand.

Code your bike- Steel and rubber are becoming the commodity that thieves and desperados are taking advantage of, both shamelessly as well as professionally. That’s why the police encourage  you to code your bike so that the information is registered in the files and in case your bike gets stolen, they can track it down in a hurry.  They are effective, and a person can get his/her bike back without having to worry about buying a new one, as seen in the clip. The only caveat to this is by the time the bike is found, all that is left is the frame as the rest are taken for the purpose of (….). If a person is desperate to steal a rubber handle of a bike horn, he/she is willing to do everything. But being safe than sorry, coding means security against such theft. The police and other authorities have coding sessions on a regular basis, so ask if you are interested.

13064728_1154660557897925_5273349102716688573_o

Know your bike- Most victims of bike theft don’t know their bike is stolen until it’s too late. One second the bike is in the bike stand, the next second it is stolen. If this happens and you report it to the police right away (which you should), make sure you know your bike and its description to the finest detail. This includes providing a photo of your bike, however, it also includes what your bike has for features, such as the brand, color, features but also other items, such as dirt, scratches, stickers, etc. A few months back, my bike was stolen, forcing me to report it to the police. I was amazed at the number of features I could remember on my bike, as seen in the picture above- can you identify some unusual features my bike has? …..

31708_122931727737485_1779162_n

Know your neighbors and contact them- Your neighbors are a primary commodity, especially when they see you cycling and know what bike you have. Therefore, in case something happens to your bike, inform them right away. They will keep their eyes out and ensure that your bike is safe and sound. Most of the time, they are willing to cooperate with the police and other authorities should the theft be reported and that be a necessity.  I was fortunate that one of my neighbors in the apartment block, who had been informed of someone stealing the bike, found it a few blocks away while I was reporting the incident. However not all stories have happy endings. Therefore, take good care of your bike and….

Lock your bike if not in use- It takes a second for your bike to disappear. It is stupid to have your bike stolen- stupider when you don’t lock it beforehand. Two seconds with a key saves a whole day at the police station reporting it, period.

13113026_1149255401771774_1476528011566377764_o

Flensburg Points apply to the bike- Like the car, the bike is a vehicle and therefore, the rules of the road apply to the cyclists, even if they are on the bike-autobahn and other bike trails. Obey and you won’t have to pay for a Flensburg point.

Use your head, wear a helmet!- While some people believe helmets can be harmful than helpful, here’s one story a professor mentioned to his students at the beginning of a lecture, a while back: On his way to his lecture, he was involved in an accident with a car. He suffered a concussion after the impact but survived thanks to the helmet he wore. Can you imagine what would have happened had he NOT worn a helmet? If you are a fool, try it. But if your life as well as your family and friends matter, then maybe you should think and wear it! 80 Euros for a helmet is better than 80,000 Euros for funeral costs.

Biking can be a lot of fun for yourself as well as the family. Already it is the second main form of transportation behind public transportation, regardless of purpose. It is just a matter of following a few points regarding taking care of the bike, and the vehicle can be your friend for life. Bikes deserve to be treated just like a horse. They can get you from point A to point B, but they deserve the treatment as any pet- or car. If the bike fails and you are tired of it, give it to someone else, or do like I did to a used one: tie it to a light post and allow someone to take it for his own. It was a custom I invented when leaving a university for another job offer elsewhere in Germany- not just as a way of leaving a mark for what I did there, but for someone willing to take my used bike for his/her purpose, while purchased my current bike, a black Diamant with the name of Galloping Gertie, which has not failed me since then. Sometimes, a good brand name plus good maintenance goes a long way, especially after the thousands of kilometers she has accumulated in such a short time. You can do the same too. 🙂

flefi-deutschland-logo

7 Reasons Why You SHOULD Learn A Foreign Language

This last installment in the series on Germany and culture by California Globetrotter deals with the importance of learning a foreign language. Regardless of where you go and for what purpose, you will find that English is not used everywhere, and learning a foreign language opens more horizons than you think. Check it out as well as the basics of German expression in the comment section…. 🙂

California Globetrotter

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My first encounter with learning a foreign language started at the young age of 8 or 9 when I temporarily had to go to a predominately Mexican school. I remember struggling to learn math because my teachers would often speak in Spanish. This was no easy task for a native English speaker. Needless to say, my math is terrible. But I remember the joy of standing in our school auditorium, wearing my best dress and singing Feliz Navidad fluently with the rest of my class at Christmas. Ever since, I have had a love affair with this song and languages.

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100 Things I’ve Learned About Germans (and the Bavarians!)

100 Things I’ve Learned About Germans (and the Bavarians!)

Here’s another installment of the series by the California Globetrotter on German Culture. I have to admit, when reading this, there were some items I didn’t know existed in Germany, despite having lived in the country since 1999. Have a look at the 100 things this guest columnist learned about Germany and feel free to add to the list…..

California Globetrotter

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I would like to clarify before you read this blog, that these are just my opinions and beliefs from my experience living in Germany. They are in no way to be taken as a prejudice against Germans as a whole. I know that Germans are more than just beer drinkers, bratwurst eaters and Lederhosen wearers.

1. They have a strict adherence to following ALL rules. Breaking these rules will definitely give you some serious looks of disapproval.

2. Many Germans like it when they see someone trying to speak German. But because they speak pretty good English, they’ll talk to you in English.

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An Expats Guide To Living In Germany

An Expats Guide To Living In Germany

This is one of three guest column series by the California Globetrotter dealing with German culture and other facts. While some of us are familiar to how Germans behave, there are some customs we don’t know about, as you can see in this guest column. Enjoy! 🙂

California Globetrotter

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After living in Germany now for almost 4 years, I thought it was time to compile some helpful hints and clarify some things for any future expats out there looking to move to Germany or for people in general hoping to travel here. There is a huge misconception about how Germans are viewed. Most have an image in their head of a lederhosen wearing, sausage eating, beer guzzlers who shout loudly. Well have no fear, I’m here to clear the air!

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Germany Quiz Nr. 7: The Answers to the Quiz on Saxony-Anhalt

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After doing some research on the things that are typical and stand out for the German state of Saxony-Anhalt, many of you are wondering what the answers to the Guessing Quiz on the most sparsely populated state in Germany but also one with lots of surprises. Well, here are some facts that are worth thinking about:

  1. Which of the four states does Saxony-Anhalt border?   a. Thuringia   b. Brandenburg   c. Lower Saxony   d. Saxony   e. all of them

ANS: e. all of them

  1. List the following cities in Saxony-Anhalt in order of population, beginning with the largest:

 

ANS:  1. Halle (Saale)-232,470 

  1. Magdeburg- 232,306
  2. Dessau-Rosslau- 83,061
  3. Lutherstadt-Wittenberge- 46,621
  4. Halberstadt- 40,440
  5. Weissenfels- 39,918
  6. Bernburg- 33,633
  7. Merseburg- 33,317
  8. Naumburg (Saale)- 32,756
  9. Sangerhausen- 30,648
  10. Quedlinburg- 24,742
  1. Match the following photos with the cities listed in Nr. 2. (Hint: Two of these belong to one city.)
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A.   Magdeburg: The World Clock Statue
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B. Magdeburg: Hundertwasser House
C. Quedlinburg: Typical Fachwerk House
The cathedral churches and the statue of George Friedrich Handel at Halle (Saale)'s city center. Photo taken in 2012
D. Halle (Saale): The City Center, Cathedrals and Statue of Handel

IMGP8921E. Naumburg (Saale): City Hall

 

  1. True or False: No police commissioners from the German mystery series Tatort has ever covered Saxony-Anhalt.

ANS: False: The nearest Tatort episodes were taped in Leipzig and Hannover. Interesting Fact is that another police series Polizei 110 has its venue in Magdeburg

 

  1. True or False (2 answers): The slogan for Saxony-Anhalt is Frühaufsteher, which stands for people going to work early in the morning (_____).  The people who do that (mainly farmers) are proud of that heritage (_______).

ANS: False on BOTH counts. The slogan Frühaufsteher refers to people commuting to bigger cities for work during the week but have their residence in Saxony-Anhalt. It is easy to have a word-for-word translation for this slogan and refer this to the farmers getting up at 5:00am to start their work, yet it is not true in this case.  Most of the people in Saxony-Anhalt (farmers included) hate the slogan so much that after five years, it was removed from the highways this year.

 

  1. True or False (3 answers) Martin Luther, the Protestant who presented the 95 Thesis harshly criticizing the Catholic Church, was born in and died in the same city (_______). His wife Katherina von Bora was not from Saxony-Anhalt originally (_______). She crafted the first champaign for him as a refresher for the brain (________).

ANS: True for the first answer- Lutherstadt Eisleben. He was born there in 1483 and died there in 1546

True for the second answer. She was born in Lippendorf in Saxony. It’s located near Leipzig.

False for the third answer. She created the first handcrafted beer for Martin Luther (see article here)

 

  1. Walter Gropius is famous for this (choose one):

_The founding of Bauhaus Dessau-Rosslau

_The creation of Worlitz Park near Dessau-Rosslau

_ The Nebra Arch

_The creation of the East German Museum in Bernburg

 ANS: A. Walter Gropius (* 1883) founded the Bauhaus University of Architecture in Dessau-Rosslau in 1919. Despite leaving his mark in architectural designs of his buildings and memorials, he emigrated to the US in 1934 after the Nazis attacked and condemned his architecture as a work of Marxism. He resided there until his death in 1969.

 

  1. Which of the following concertos was written by George Friedrich Handel, a composer originating from Saxony-Anhalt in the city of (____________)?

ANS: Halle (Saale). Handel (* 1685; died 1759) was famous for the following pieces: Alexander’s Feast, Messiah, Water Music, Music for the Royal Fireworks, and others in the Baroque Era.

 

  1. True or False: Johann Sebastian Bach originated from Magdeburg.

ANS: False.  Bach was born in Eisenach (Thuringia) and died in Leipzig.

 

  1. True or False: The late Hans Diedrich Genscher, one of the founding fathers of the Free Democratic Party of Germany originated from Halle (Saale).

ANS: Genscher, who established the FDP as a liberal party in East Germany, was born in Halle (Saale). He was an influential figure for the people of the former East Germany at the time of its reunification with West Germany. He died in 2016  in Wachtberg. The party itself was established in West Germany in 1948 and has been the longest running party on the German scene, having had members in the Bundestag for every year until 2013.

 

  1. True or False: Sven Köhler, one of the longest tenured soccer head coaches from Halle FC, grew up in and played for the team in Halle.

ANS: False. Köhler coached Halle FC for eight years, yet his origin is in Chemnitz, where he is now head coach of Chemnitz FC (since March 2016)

 

  1. True or False: Halle FC and FC Magdeburg are the only two teams in Saxony Anhalt which marched through the regional soccer league in one season enroute to the national stage (counting the 3rd tier of the German Bundesliga).

ANS: True. Halle achieved this in 2012/13 and Magdeburg in 2014/15.

 

  1. True or False: The handball teams of SC Magdeburg (men) and the Halle Lions (women) compete in the premere league.

ANS: False. Only the SC Magdeburg has a men’s handball team in the premere league. The Halle Lions have a women’s basketball team in the premere league.

 

  1. Which of the following beers originate from Saxony-Anhalt?

Porter              Hasseröder                 Gessener                     St. Moritz                   Glauchauer

 ANS: Hasselrödaer beer originates from Saxony-Anhalt and is brewed in Wenigerode

 

  1. Which of the following specialties are NOT considered a pastry?

Bienenstich                Nähstänge                  Garley             Baumkuchen            Streuselkuchen

 ANS:  Garley. Garley is not only a traditional soup for Saxony-Anhalt, but also the name of the oldest brand named  beer in the world, having been brewed in Saxony-Anhalt from 1314 until its closure in 2013.

 

  1. True or False: The Nähstänge is a pastry that originate from  Tangermünde.

ANS: True. Consisting of a burro-shaped pastry filled with chocolate, the Nähstänge is a local specialty of Tagermünde, in northwestern Saxony-Anhalt.

 

  1. What constitutes a typical Bauernfrühstück in Saxony-Anhalt?

ANS:  This one consistes of potatoes, onions and eggs. More on the recipe here.

 

  1. The Weinmeile is an annual event that takes place in Freyburg (in the Saale-Unstrut Region),  famous for the production of wine and sect  
  1. What is a Feuerstein from Schierke?

ANS: The Schierke Feuerstein is a half-bitter herbal liquor with 35% alcohol and is 70-proof. Best served cold and in combination to form long drinks, the beverage was developed by Willy Drube and the name was derived from the redness of the color of granite, located in the Harz Mountain region. Still exists today and highly recommended. 

 

  1. If legend is true (and it still is), salt is the most priceless commodity that exist in Saxony-Anhalt. Which areas can you find salt production?

ANS: True. Salt is still being mined today in areas west and south of Halle (Saale) and has a lot of value as a mineral.

 

  1. Salt is used for what purposes?

ANS: Salt is used for spicing food, as an inhalant for colds and other ailments, and for various forms of physical and psychological therapy.

 

  1. Which of the cities in Saxony-Anhalt does NOT have a castle?

Halle (Saale), Naumburg (Saale), Magdeburg, Sangerhausen, Quedlinburg, Dessau-Rosslau, Tangermünde

ANS: Magdeburg 

 

  1. Which of the following cities have a cathedral?

Naumburg (Saale),  Magdeburg,  Halle (Saale), Havelberg, Lutherstadt Wittenberge, Arendsee

 ANS: All except Arendsee have at least one cathedral. Arendsee is a lake and resort town.

 

  1. How many churches and “klosters” does Magdeburg have?

ANS: One cathedral and 13 churches exist in Magdeburg. Before World War II the number of churches was 20.

 

25.  How many bridges do the following cities have? Name two of them per city you know. (Click on the names of the cities for more information on the city’s bridges)

Magdeburg:  70+ 

Halle (Saale): 131

Quedlinburg: 20+

Zeitz: 15

Merseburg: 3- including the Leuna Arch Bridge, the stone arch bridge and the railroad overpass at the train station. 

 

26. Match the pictures of the bridges with that of the locations below.  Name the bridge if you know it.

Click here and scroll down to find the answers.

Halle (Saale)    Magdeburg    Zeitz    Bad Kösen    Saale-Unstrut Region    Merseburg   Quedlinburg    Tangermünde    Köthen

 

Check out sister column the Bridgehunter’s Chronicles for more on the bridges in Saxony-Anhalt, including those in Quedlinburg, Magdeburg and the Saale-Unstrut Region. In the meantime, onto the next German state…… 🙂

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Germany Quiz Nr. 7: The Answers to the Quiz on Saxony-Anhalt

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After doing some research on the things that are typical and stand out for the German state of Saxony-Anhalt, many of you are wondering what the answers to the Guessing Quiz on the most sparsely populated state in Germany but also one with lots of surprises. Well, here are some facts that are worth thinking about:

 

  1. Which of the four states does Saxony-Anhalt border?   a. Thuringia   b. Brandenburg   c. Lower Saxony   d. Saxony   e. all of them

ANS: e. all of them

 

  1. List the following cities in Saxony-Anhalt in order of population, beginning with the largest:

 

ANS:  1. Halle (Saale)-232,470 

  1. Magdeburg- 232,306
  2. Dessau-Rosslau- 83,061
  3. Lutherstadt-Wittenberge- 46,621
  4. Halberstadt- 40,440
  5. Weissenfels- 39,918
  6. Bernburg- 33,633
  7. Merseburg- 33,317
  8. Naumburg (Saale)- 32,756
  9. Sangerhausen- 30,648
  10. Quedlinburg- 24,742

 

3. Match the following photos with the cities listed in Nr. 2. (Hint: Two of these belong to one city.)

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A.   Magdeburg: The World Clock Statue
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B. Magdeburg: Hundertwasser House
C. Quedlinburg: Typical Fachwerk House
The cathedral churches and the statue of George Friedrich Handel at Halle (Saale)'s city center. Photo taken in 2012
D. Halle (Saale): The City Center, Cathedrals and Statue of Handel

 

IMGP8921E. Naumburg (Saale): City Hall

 

  1. True or False: No police commissioners from the German mystery series Tatort has ever covered Saxony-Anhalt.

ANS: False: The nearest Tatort episodes were taped in Leipzig and Hannover. Interesting Fact is that another police series Polizei 110 has its venue in Magdeburg

 

  1. True or False (2 answers): The slogan for Saxony-Anhalt is Frühaufsteher, which stands for people going to work early in the morning (_____).  The people who do that (mainly farmers) are proud of that heritage (_______).

ANS: False on BOTH counts. The slogan Frühaufsteher refers to people commuting to bigger cities for work during the week but have their residence in Saxony-Anhalt. It is easy to have a word-for-word translation for this slogan and refer this to the farmers getting up at 5:00am to start their work, yet it is not true in this case.  Most of the people in Saxony-Anhalt (farmers included) hate the slogan so much that after five years, it was removed from the highways this year.

 

 

  1. True or False (3 answers) Martin Luther, the Protestant who presented the 95 Thesis harshly criticizing the Catholic Church, was born in and died in the same city (_______). His wife Katherina von Bora was not from Saxony-Anhalt originally (_______). She crafted the first champaign for him as a refresher for the brain (________).

ANS: True for the first answer- Lutherstadt Eisleben. He was born there in 1483 and died there in 1546

True for the second answer. She was born in Lippendorf in Saxony. It’s located near Leipzig.

False for the third answer. She created the first handcrafted beer for Martin Luther (see article here)

 

  1. Walter Gropius is famous for this (choose one):

_The founding of Bauhaus Dessau-Rosslau

_The creation of Worlitz Park near Dessau-Rosslau

_ The Nebra Arch

_The creation of the East German Museum in Bernburg

 ANS: A. Walter Gropius (* 1883) founded the Bauhaus University of Architecture in Dessau-Rosslau in 1919. Despite leaving his mark in architectural designs of his buildings and memorials, he emigrated to the US in 1934 after the Nazis attacked and condemned his architecture as a work of Marxism. He resided there until his death in 1969.

 

  1. Which of the following concertos was written by George Friedrich Handel, a composer originating from Saxony-Anhalt in the city of (____________)?

ANS: Halle (Saale). Handel (* 1685; died 1759) was famous for the following pieces: Alexander’s Feast, Messiah, Water Music, Music for the Royal Fireworks, and others in the Baroque Era.

 

  1. True or False: Johann Sebastian Bach originated from Magdeburg.

ANS: False.  Bach was born in Eisenach (Thuringia) and died in Leipzig.

 

  1. True or False: The late Hans Diedrich Genscher, one of the founding fathers of the Free Democratic Party of Germany originated from Halle (Saale).

ANS: Genscher, who established the FDP as a liberal party in East Germany, was born in Halle (Saale). He was an influential figure for the people of the former East Germany at the time of its reunification with West Germany. He died in 2016  in Wachtberg. The party itself was established in West Germany in 1948 and has been the longest running party on the German scene, having had members in the Bundestag for every year until 2013.

 

  1. True or False: Sven Köhler, one of the longest tenured soccer head coaches from Halle FC, grew up in and played for the team in Halle.

ANS: False. Köhler coached Halle FC for eight years, yet his origin is in Chemnitz, where he is now head coach of Chemnitz FC (since March 2016)

 

  1. True or False: Halle FC and FC Magdeburg are the only two teams in Saxony Anhalt which marched through the regional soccer league in one season enroute to the national stage (counting the 3rd tier of the German Bundesliga).

ANS: True. Halle achieved this in 2012/13 and Magdeburg in 2014/15.

 

  1. True or False: The handball teams of SC Magdeburg (men) and the Halle Lions (women) compete in the premere league.

ANS: False. Only the SC Magdeburg has a men’s handball team in the premere league. The Halle Lions have a women’s basketball team in the premere league.

 

  1. Which of the following beers originate from Saxony-Anhalt?

Porter              Hasseröder                 Gessener                     St. Moritz                   Glauchauer

 ANS: Hasselrödaer beer originates from Saxony-Anhalt and is brewed in Wenigerode

  1. Which of the following specialties are NOT considered a pastry?

Bienenstich                Nähstänge                  Garley             Baumkuchen            Streuselkuchen

 ANS:  Garley. Garley is not only a traditional soup for Saxony-Anhalt, but also the name of the oldest brand named  beer in the world, having been brewed in Saxony-Anhalt from 1314 until its closure in 2013.

 

  1. True or False: The Nähstänge is a pastry that originate from  Tangermünde.

ANS: True. Consisting of a burro-shaped pastry filled with chocolate, the Nähstänge is a local specialty of Tagermünde, in northwestern Saxony-Anhalt.

 

  1. What constitutes a typical Bauernfrühstück in Saxony-Anhalt?

ANS:  This one consistes of potatoes, onions and eggs. More on the recipe here.

 

  1. The Weinmeile is an annual event that takes place in Freyburg (in the Saale-Unstrut Region),  famous for the production of wine and sect  

 

  1. What is a Feuerstein from Schierke?

ANS: The Schierke Feuerstein is a half-bitter herbal liquor with 35% alcohol and is 70-proof. Best served cold and in combination to form long drinks, the beverage was developed by Willy Drube and the name was derived from the redness of the color of granite, located in the Harz Mountain region. Still exists today and highly recommended. 

 

20. If legend is true (and it still is), salt is the most priceless commodity that exist in Saxony-Anhalt. Which areas can you find salt production?

ANS: True. Salt is still being mined today in areas west and south of Halle (Saale) and has a lot of value as a mineral.

 

  1. Salt is used for what purposes?

ANS: Salt is used for spicing food, as an inhalant for colds and other ailments, and for various forms of physical and psychological therapy.

 

  1. Which of the cities in Saxony-Anhalt does NOT have a castle?

Halle (Saale), Naumburg (Saale), Magdeburg, Sangerhausen, Quedlinburg, Dessau-Rosslau, Tangermünde

ANS: Magdeburg 

 

  1. Which of the following cities have a cathedral?

Naumburg (Saale),  Magdeburg,  Halle (Saale), Havelberg, Lutherstadt Wittenberge, Arendsee

 ANS: All except Arendsee have at least one cathedral. Arendsee is a lake and resort town.

 

  1. How many churches and “klosters” does Magdeburg have?

ANS: One cathedral and 13 churches exist in Magdeburg. Before World War II the number of churches was 20.

 

25.  How many bridges do the following cities have? Name two of them per city you know. (Click on the names of the cities for more information on the city’s bridges)

Magdeburg:  70+ 

Halle (Saale): 131

Quedlinburg: 20+

Zeitz: 15

Merseburg: 3- including the Leuna Arch Bridge, the stone arch bridge and the railroad overpass at the train station. 

 

26. Match the pictures of the bridges with that of the locations below.  Name the bridge if you know it.

Halle (Saale)    Magdeburg    Zeitz    Bad Kösen    Saale-Unstrut Region    Merseburg   Quedlinburg    Tangermünde    Köthen

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Check out sister column the Bridgehunter’s Chronicles for more on the bridges in Saxony-Anhalt, including those in Quedlinburg, Magdeburg and the Saale-Unstrut Region. In the meantime, onto the next German state…… 🙂

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Genre of the Week: Wir sind die Neuen

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Our next genre of the week looks at generational conflicts and how each one handles societal problems differently. Produced by Ralf Westhoff, Wir sind die Neuen (translated as We are the New Neighbors) features two sets of three people, each coming from two different generations. The Babyboomer generation features Annie, a biologist, Johannes, a lawyer and Eddie, a musician. Each one had their professions rise and fall and all of them are single, although Eddie reveals something far worse during the latter part of the story. Annie was evicted from her apartment and decided to create a dormitory with her two friends from college, Eddie and Johannes,  at their old apartment near campus of the university in Munich, the setting of the story. Despite their return to the days of talking about philosophy and God over a bottle of red wine, they face two conflicts: the change in personality and lifestyles over the years- which the three manage to handle in one way or another- and the centerpiece of conflicts in the story, dealing with three college students, Katharina, Thorsten and Barbara. They come from rich families, are textbook about the rules of the apartment- and thus come into conflict with the three older sixty-something inhabitants- and spend amples of time buried in the internet/laptop. Yet, they cannot grapple with the life that is outside their apartment, which includes dealing with humor, heartbreak and love, and the basics of taking care of themselves and their health. Their obsession is trying to complete their studies in law, yet being buried in books, they feel hopeless and eventually, despite their personality conflicts with Annie, Johannes and Eddie, they drop their differences and accept their offer of help. With the willingness to be open, a lot of things happen to all the characters in the story, bridging the gap between the generation that is in the twilight in their lifetimes and the generation that is blossoming and have a promising a future.

Wir sind die Neuen focuses on several aspects that can be discussed in any situation, even in the classroom. The first is dealing with the differences between the Babyboomer Generation (those born between 1945 and 1965 and were children of the parents who had served in World War II) and the Y Generation (those born from 1985 onwards) as well as the characteristics and culture values that are important to each one. This includes the music they listen to, the topics they pay attention to in the news, and their philosophical standpoint in life. Coming from the “Bridge-Generation,” known as the X-Generation (those born between 1966 and 1984), we seem to be sandwiched between the two different spheres the generations present to us. While we have created our own identities and culture, we seem to have adopted much of this from our parents as well as those who are much younger than we are.  So one aspect we can look at is what is typical of the two generations in the story and provide examples of conflicts that could potentially come between the two generations.

Another aspect worth noting is the lifestyle in Germany between the two generations and the comparison with that of another country, like the US, Britain or any European country. This includes university life, culture,  the way of thinking, etc. Many of these examples were brought up in the film.  And finally, one should have a look at how people change in life. Especially in the Baby Boomer generation, the characters among the group developed differently that there were conflicts among the group. The return to the “good old days” was an attempt to recognize their ownself, reconcile with each other for their differences and lastly, reboot their lives and try something new, or supplement their careers, as was the case with Johannes.

The film’s main theme, especially when you look at the preview is this: No matter the difference, we are all the same in one way or another. If we want to help each other succeed, we need to tear the walls down and build the bridge to bring the two together. If you are unsure how, check out the film. There are many ways of how it can be done.

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Mystery Building Nr. 5: A Silo or An NSA Complex?

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Photo taken in July 2016

In the run-up to the next quiz series on Thuringia and Saxony, I came across a phenomenon that will spark a discussion regarding what this structure really is. Located between the towns of Altenburg and Gössnitz on the Thuringian-Saxony border, this building is located smack in the middle of corn and wheat fields with a few trees surrounding it. It is difficult to tell how high or wide this building is. We do know that despite it sitting on the drifting hills which includes the valley of the Pleisse River and its tributaries, the building is high enough to be seen high above the trees from the train travelling on the line connecting Gera and Gössnitz, like in the picture below:

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Ibid.

It is also tall enough that a person can photograph it from a distance of over 25 kilometers, as seen in the photo at the beginning of this article.  That was taken near the Thomas Müntzer Siedlung, located south of Hauensdorf and east of Lehndorf.  Keeping this in mind, let’s estimate the height to be at least 30 meters.

It appearance is rather spooky as the base features a cylindrical shape, but the top quarter has a spherical appearance with pentagonal patterns. Separating the two shapes, both of whom have a grayish green color, is an observation deck which a person can access with a flight of stairs zig-zagging its way to the ground. A housing complex is located just to the north of the tower.

This leads to one of three theories:

  1. Central Intelligence Tower: The tower is part of the central intelligence complex, which collects information for use. The design would make the most sense, given the fact that spying has been part of the livelihood of the people living in the region. Altenburg was part of the former East Germany, and the Honnecker Regime cooperated with the Soviets regarding collecting information from the western half of Europe as part of the plan to protect its borders from a nuclear attack. With the events involving the Berlin Wall, Prague Spring and the NATO Weapons stationed in West Germany before Reagan, having a tower in the middle of nowhere served as a out-of-sight complex protecting the East Germans. To keep them from fleeing to the West, it was probably used as a spy tool to keep them in tact and within their borders.  Since Germany and America’s NSA have an agreement on data-collecting, the tower probably has been used since 1989 for that purpose- especially now because of the potential threat from Russia and the terrorists, something that many people on both sides don’t agree with. Privacy has become more and more tabu these days because of the willingness of Berlin and Washington to pry open the activities of their normal citizens…..
  2. Water Tower: The tower is nothing more than a water tower, collecting and storing water for the towns along the Pleisse and its tributaries. Logistically speaking, this would make the best sense as the region is surrounded by farmland, and water is needed to foster crop-growth. Perhaps despite its unusual design, the water tower was conceived out of the “spy tower” after 1989 after it was rendered useless. As many water towers have different shapes, especially after a lengthy discussion about the water tower in Glauchau (see article for more), this idea may not be far from the truth.
  3. Communal Silo: The same applies for the silo concept, where crops are stored there. What would support the argument here is the housing surrounding it, resembling a farmstead. What would make this argument redundant is the fact that silos are rare in numbers in Germany. Unlike in rural America, where one in two farmsteads have at least one silo, in rural Germany, it is most likely one in 10,000 because of the population density, combined with limited space for farming. If a silo exists, then most likely as a communal one owned by the city of Altenburg.

There could be other opinions to this, like an army complex, power plant, grain elevator, etc., but having an unusual shape makes these arguments questionable. This leads to the question of what exactly this tower is, when it was built and for what purpose, and lastly, is it still in use.

Any ideas? Feel free to comment…… 🙂

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